O&M launches Samaritans ads

The telephone counselling charity, the Samaritans, has launched a dramatic black-and-white press campaign which aims to underline the approachable and confidential nature of its service.

The telephone counselling charity, the Samaritans, has launched a

dramatic black-and-white press campaign which aims to underline the

approachable and confidential nature of its service.



The four ads, created by Ogilvy and Mather, use the endline: ’The

Samaritans.



We’ll go through it with you.’ They will run in the national press over

the next year.



The first execution, which targets young people, uses the headline:

’Sometimes it’s easier to talk to someone you don’t like.’ A photo of a

fresh-faced teenage girl sits on the left-hand side of the ad.



The second ad shows the back view of three policemen next to the

headline: ’Some people we won’t talk to.’



The third execution shows pictures of four people. The captions

underneath explain their worries. One reads: ’Her husband’s having an

affair. Should she walk out?’



The ads were created by the O&M copywriters, Tony Strong and Mike Bear,

and the art directors, Marcus Vinton, Mitch Levy and Brent Gosling.

Photography was by Edward Sykes and Colin Jones.



The copy beside the photo reads: ’When you have a problem, it’s the most

natural thing in the world to want to talk it through with someone.



Sometimes, though, this creates another problem: who’s the best person

to confide in?’ It continues: You don’t have to be climbing up the walls

before you call us - any problem, big or small, is a good enough reason

to pick up the phone. You’ll find we’re remarkably easy to talk to.’



The text on the right reads: ’When you call the Samaritans you call in

confidence. No-one, but no-one, finds out. We get teenagers on the phone

confessing to things that would give their parents heart attacks ...

We’d even be happy to hear from policeman. So long as it’s sympathy they

want and not information.’



Another asks: ’His wife died three years ago. Should he be over it by

now?’