O&M’s new Impulse film shows girl flirting with father and son

Ogilvy & Mather has followed up its controversial advertising for Impulse Body Spray with a TV and cinema commercial showing a confident young woman attracting men of all ages.

Ogilvy & Mather has followed up its controversial advertising for

Impulse Body Spray with a TV and cinema commercial showing a confident

young woman attracting men of all ages.



The branding ad is the third in an annual campaign and is based around

research that shows young women today feel confident and in control of

their sexuality.



It succeeds ’art school’ - which depicted a nude male model getting an

erection - and ’chance encounter’ - which was the first mainstream UK

commercial to feature a gay couple.



The ad features a young woman who is late for her bar job. As she rushes

out of her flat, she bumps into her sexy young neighbour and pauses to

flirt. At work, an older man notices her smell and is instantly

interested.



The pair’s eyes meet until they are interrupted by the entrance of the

sexy neighbour. The pair look up to greet him and it emerges that he is

the son of the older admirer.



The ad finishes on a dated black and white photo of the father and son

with the strapline: ’Men can’t help acting on Impulse.’



’Bar’, which breaks on 7 June, was art directed by Christian Cotterill

and written by Justin Hooper. It was directed by Harold Zwart through

the Pink Films. Media planning and buying is by Initiative Media.



Gabrielle Dell’apa, Elida Faberge’s brand manager, said the company had

conducted research into the changing attitudes of young women. ’Most are

tired of the historical stereotypes and wish to break away from the

restrictive cliches of the past - femme fatale, bimbo, gold digger.’



She added: ’We are focusing on women who appreciate that a good sense of

humour generates happiness and success, not necessarily a romance. We

chose this commercial because it captured the thrill of anticipation and

contained the vital element of humour that our target market loves.’