OPINION: EVANS ON ... BT’S YOUTH MARKETING

How many campaigns addressing the youth market make you wince with embarrassment? Campaigns created by clients and agencies who believe they understand the ’yoof’ of today, but who turn out work that’s as about as convincing as your dad at a disco.

How many campaigns addressing the youth market make you wince with

embarrassment? Campaigns created by clients and agencies who believe

they understand the ’yoof’ of today, but who turn out work that’s as

about as convincing as your dad at a disco.



BT recognises the slender distinction between getting it wrong and the

dream marketing coup. Why so? Because no other audience can so

unerringly spot an impostor a mile away. But, equally, no other audience

embraces the revolution in the communications market so

wholeheartedly.



The explosion in mobile ownership following the introduction of pre-pay

packages like Cellnet ’U’, the mass adoption of e-mail as a

communication medium and the use of the internet as an educational and a

social tool are all indications of the role communication plays in young

lives. Young people devour new technology in ways that put previous

generations to shame, and use communications to help cram as much

experience as possible into the limited confines of a 24-hour day.



But young people are not only BT’s future - they are also our here and

now, entering the communications world from many different angles.

That’s why, as a company, we want to lead the communications pack with a

far-sighted portfolio of products and services to meet and predict their

ever-growing needs.



We must target young people because so many of the products we supply,

from mobile telephony and free e-mail addresses to digital phonelines

that speed up internet access, suit their requirements. And - the good

news for us - our research tells us this audience feels reassured by the

scale and reliability that BT offers. That it is a brand and a service

they can trust. So - an audience that trusts us and welcomes what we

offer.



What a prospect. And what a communications challenge.



The reality is that, until now, BT, like many established brands, has

skirted round this audience. It is vital that we now engage them

directly by demonstrating both our understanding of them and how our

products can help them to a better life. Agency ’yoof’ credentials are

full of examples of big brands that have got it wrong, who have failed

to treat this audience with the respect and the focus it demands. We

will not become one of those case studies.



Instead, we are developing a dedicated marketing programme and have

deliberately separated youth out from our mass business. Together with

St Luke’s, we are creating an integrated programme of activity that will

help us to build relevant relationships with a youthful audience that

will benefit us and them today, tomorrow and into the future.



It is a challenge that we take on with relish and with the clear vision

that this is so much more than just an extension to our core activity.

And to meet that challenge we are ready to make whatever changes we need

to the way we think and the way we do things. Marketing communications

in the youth sector may never be the same again. Watch this space.



Become a member of Campaign from just £46 a quarter

Get the very latest news and insight from Campaign with unrestricted access to campaignlive.co.uk plus get exclusive discounts to Campaign events

Looking for a new job?

Get the latest creative jobs in advertising, media, marketing and digital delivered directly to your inbox each day.

Create an Alert Now

Partner content

Share

1 Job description: Digital marketing executive

Digital marketing executives oversee the online marketing strategy for their organisation. They plan and execute digital (including email) marketing campaigns and design, maintain and supply content for the organisation's website(s).