Outsmart and IPAO launch data tool to boost confidence in outdoor ads

Outsmart, the marketing body for the out-of-home advertising industry, and the IPA's outdoor specialists have launched a new data-led tool for outdoor advertisers.

Alan Brydon: says the new Space product will give brands more confidence when buying outdoor ads
Alan Brydon: says the new Space product will give brands more confidence when buying outdoor ads

The data management application, called Space, is designed to store, categorise and standardise every piece of OOH inventory within the UK market.

The IPAO and Outsmart believe Space will offer advertisers more information about historical competitive data and the geographical placement of outdoor ads.

The database registers 500,000 outdoor frames, each with a unique identification code, which gleans from each site information about production requirements or mobile touchpoint references.

It also gives the user access to audience data, from Route Research, and can calculate a site’s proximity to socially sensitive locations (such as schools), for which some ads may require a restriction.

Alan Brydon, the chief executive at Outsmart, said: "This is an example of best-in-class collaboration across the out-of-home industry.

"It gives us an excellent platform from which to develop the increasing requirement for data management and exchange, which will continue to give brands the confidence to embrace out-of-home."

In September, the Outdoor Media Centre rebranded to Outsmart and its team is being expanded by Brydon to include a full-time team of ten.


Subscribe to Campaign from just £57 per quarter

Includes the weekly magazine and quarterly Campaign IQ, plus unrestricted online access.


Looking for a new job?

Get the latest creative jobs in advertising, media, marketing and digital delivered directly to your inbox each day.

Create an Alert Now

1 How Sainsbury's ads revolutionised the UK's food culture

Abbott Mead Vickers' press ads for Sainsbury's in the 1980s formed the most influential and culturally significant campaign the UK has ever produced, argues Paul Burke.

Just published