Pitch update: Virgin Atlantic, Monarch and Broadbandchoices

This week there are updates on the Virgin Atlantic and Monarch Airlines advertising pitches, as well as Broadbandchoices' media review and something intriguing from BMW.

BMW: invites agencies to submit to future projects
BMW: invites agencies to submit to future projects

As the lucky few among us prepare to soak up the sun and the rosé (as well as, of course, the work) in Cannes, spare a thought for those poor souls back in Blighty keeping the new-business wheels turning. Virgin Atlantic has thrown a damp towel (sadly, not of the beach variety) on the proceedings with its decision to give final briefings to its four chosen shops – Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO, Adam & Eve/DDB, Rainey Kelly Campbell Roalfe/Y&R and The Brooklyn Brothers – in Cannes week. This means that some have been forced to cut their trip to the south of France short.

Monarch Airlines, the other airline that is reviewing its advertising, has also shortlisted agencies that it wants to proceed to the next stage. The process is being overseen by Monarch’s new managing director, Andrew Swaffield, who joined in April. The incumbent is Iris Worldwide.

Havas Media, PHD and UM London have made the shortlist for the media pitch for Broadbandchoices, the telecoms comparison site. The longlist featured six shops but Goodstuff Communications, the7stars and Vizeum are no longer involved. 

Finally, ad agencies have had their curiosity piqued after BMW invited them to submit to a "future projects" brief. Whatever can it mean, not least for the incumbents, WCRS and Dare? Watch this space.


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