Private View by Mark Roalfe

I bought a Sony Playstation last year, and after much struggling managed to get up to level eight on Tombraider, and then gave up. Since then it’s sat in the corner of my lounge gathering dust. These two commercials from Sony are trying to persuade me to buy its two latest games, Mercenaries and Rage Racer. Mercenaries is one of those slash and shoot sort of games and Rage Racer, well, I think you can all guess what that one’s about.

I bought a Sony Playstation last year, and after much struggling

managed to get up to level eight on Tombraider, and then gave up. Since

then it’s sat in the corner of my lounge gathering dust. These two

commercials from Sony are trying to persuade me to buy its two latest

games, Mercenaries and Rage Racer. Mercenaries is one of those slash and

shoot sort of games and Rage Racer, well, I think you can all guess what

that one’s about.



They follow the piss-take documentary style Playstation has previously

used. My favourite of the two ads is Rage Racer in which we see Gordon

Honeycomb (nice choice of presenter) talking us through the ways you can

work out your road rage. If they all fail he suggests you buy a copy of

Rage Racer. These are both good little commercials, though I’m not sure

they’re as good as the ones at the beginning of the campaign. If I can

ever make it past level eight on Tombraider I might have a go at Rage

Racer.



Advertising mid-range cars is not easy. It’s a very cluttered market -

the cars all look pretty much the same, cost much the same and perform

much the same. Only a few brands have defined personalities and they’re

probably the ones with the most memorable advertising. Having said that,

the new Ford Puma commercial is probably the highlight of this week’s TV

offerings. There’s no doubt that Ford’s advertising is going through a

bit of a renaissance and this is probably the best so far, although the

black-and-white Fiesta campaign was very good too. In this commercial we

see Steve McQueen putting the Puma through the same paces as he did his

Mustang in Bullitt. It’s very well shot and the special effects

(bringing McQueen back to life) are excellent. My only slight quibble is

that the driving sequences aren’t as exciting as they could have been,

but that’s probably because the BACC was sitting in the passenger seat

with its hands firmly on the brake.



In the new Renault Megane commercial, a bunch of great-looking girls and

boys are sitting in a restaurant watching the footie when the TV goes on

the blink. They jump in their Renault and whizz around town until they

find a TV shop where they finish watching the match. Then Renault tells

us ’this is a car that speaks your language’. I’m afraid it doesn’t

speak my language.



Next, the new commercial for Diet Lucozade. It features a cartoon

version of Viz’s Fat Slags. They open their fridge and are horrified to

find a bottle of Diet Lucozade nestling between the cream cakes and

lard. A hunk appears at the kitchen door dressed in a towel and claims

the offending bottle is his so they throw him and his bottle out. I

don’t know if this is part of a campaign but you can see how it easily

could be.



High street banking, like the mid-range car sector, is a fairly

difficult market to crack. Building societies have moved in and offer

much the same service except with a more cuddly, friendly face. You only

tend to remember your bad experiences with banks rather than when they

just do their jobs.



The problem is there’s little to choose between the high street banks

and none of them really have anything new to offer. Barclays has come up

with PC banking; a service where, I presume, you can carry out all your

banking chores from your PC at home. The posters advertising this new

service are well branded and simple as good posters should be although,

as Andrew Cracknell would say, ’they don’t really make my botty

quiver’.



However, I think this service is only changing the peripheries of

banking when what is really needed is a complete revolution.



Finally, a press ad for Olympus Digital Film that parodies an obituary

column. When I came across this ad last week while flicking through the

Guardian, I thought it was excellent. It’s a nice, simple idea that has

been beautifully crafted. I read in Campaign that the Times and the

Telegraph refused to carry it, which I can understand. It’s great to see

that the long copy ad is not dead.



Ford Europe

Project: Ford Puma

Clients: Peter Townsend, marketing communications manager, Brian Wade,

manager, specialist cars

Brief: Position the Puma as a serious sports coupe with real performance

credentials Agency: Young & Rubicam

Writer: Leighton Ballet

Art director: Lee Goulding

Director: Paul Street

Production company: Streetlight Films

Exposure: National TV

Sony

Project: Sony Playstation

Client: Geoff Glendenning, head of marketing

Brief: Continue to emphasise the powerful experience of Playstation

Agency: TBWA Simons Palmer

Writer: Ros Sinclair

Art director: Sean Thomson

Directors: BDH Athletico Production company:

The Producers

Exposure: National TV

and cinema

Olympus

Project: Olympus digital cameras

Client: Ian Dickens, communications director

Brief: Olympus digital cameras are changing photography as we know it

Agency: Lowe Howard-Spink

Writer: Paul Marshall

Art director: Gary Marshall

Typographer: Simon Warden Photographer: Robert Walker

Exposure: National press

SmithKline Beecham

Project: Lucozade Low Calorie

Client: Nick Craggs, senior product manager

Brief: Launch Lucozade Low Calorie with vitamins

Agency: Ogilvy & Mather

Writer: Justin Hooper

Art director: Christian Cotterill

Directors: Mark Denton (live action), Russell Brooke (animation)

Production companies: Godman, Passion Pictures

Exposure: National TV and satellite

Barclays Bank

Project: PC banking

Client: Tim Parkes, commercial director

Brief: Announce the launch of Barclays’ PC banking service

Agency: J. Walter Thompson Writer: Mike Foden

Art director: John Hine

Typographer: Bonita Enright

Photographer: Hugh Johnson

Exposure: London and Central posters

Renault

Project: Renault Megane

RT Sport

Client: Tim Mack, director of communications

Brief: Add style and sportiness to the hatchback range

Agency: Publicis

Writer: Noel Sharman

Art director: Mel Williams

Director: Hugh Johnson

Production company:

RSA Films

Exposure: National TV and satellite



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Digital marketing executives oversee the online marketing strategy for their organisation. They plan and execute digital (including email) marketing campaigns and design, maintain and supply content for the organisation's website(s).