PRIVATE VIEW: Steve Dunn, the executive creative director of Ogilvy & Mather

On the day I'm writing this, the front page headline on Campaign

reads: "Police slam M&C's Thomas Pink ad." Now it's my turn.



Before they send Mo and Chas round to feel my collar, let me quickly

wriggle out of it by explaining; there's nothing particularly wrong with

the Thomas Pink work. If anything, it's actually the kind of work that

has been known to win an award, but that's my problem. There are

formulas to winning awards and we largely have Cannes to thank for

it.



Concoct a flimsy strategy. Express it via a visual metaphor. Explain it

with a simple endline. Bingo. For quick food, show beans in the shape of

running shoes. For longer lasting crunchy cereal, er, what's long

lasting?



Let's show the cereal as Stonehenge.



It used to be the stuff of student books which didn't quite make the

cut. A junior team can do it as well as, if not better than, a senior

one. Less advanced markets can do it as easily as the advertising

epicentres. Anyway, before I wander off too much, to get back to Thomas

Pink.



So it's for soft shirts, is it? Playing off the universal truth, of

course, that most shirts are hard. Now for the creative bit. Let's show

"hard" men wearing "soft" shirts. And just in case those Paraguayan

jurors don't get it, put "..." after the line.



From advertising done without effort, to effortless advertising. I like

the ads for Innocent Smoothies a lot.



I think they're excellent. It's a seamless extension of product

personality running into advertising. The writing is cool and witty. The

art direction simple but deceptively crafted. For nerdy adspotters out

there, look at the texture on the type and while you're at it, read the

flyshit: "Innocent Smoothies are 54 per cent fruit. 32 per cent fruit.11

per cent fruit and 3 per cent fruit."



Now for Nike. Damn, those Wieden & Kennedy boys are such clever little

minxes. Gone are the big-bucks, high production epics of Pytka and

Tarsem.



This is stripped down, lo-fi, hardcore advertising. Basically, and I

mean basically, it's just about the awesome artistry of the sportsmen

choreographed to a thumping great rhythm track of balls bouncing

(perhaps I should re-phrase that) by Afrika Bambaata & Hydraulic

Funk.



There were eight spots on the reel but the coolest one is a

two-and-a-half-minute music video. And there's the rest of us still

writing ads.



Next Ikea, and it's another thumbs up. Have I gone Thomas Pink? No, but

Glasgow has. To announce the opening of an Ikea in the area, St Luke's

has assembled a cast Guy Ritchie would kill for. Hardened criminal types

set against quaint Gorbals backdrops eschew conversations about

kneecapping and debt collection in favour of Inca-style rugs, drapes and

lemon yellow furnishing fabric.



It's great. I'm on a roll here. If only I could re-write that M&C piece,

perhaps I could say I liked the smudged typogra ... oh bugger it, the

next video's got "Nestle" written on the front. The ad is for Snack Stop

tasty pasta meals and starts with: "Hi, my name's Geoff Capes." But

perhaps it's supposed to ... (answers on a postcard to Campaign, c/o

Jenny Watts).



Finally, a commercial for Right to Read - a charitable organisation that

is appealing for volunteers to help kids read. I don't know what's more

sad: the statistic that reveals "One in four people fail to reach basic

reading standard", which comes up as one of the titles, along with

"prepare to be shocked" and "please look away", or the fact that the

client obviously didn't know any good agencies to give his account to.

You can contact Right to Read on 0800 783 3707.



NIKE EUROPE

Project: Freestyle

Clients: Stefan Olander, brand communications director, EMEA; Paolo

Tubito, brand communications manager, EMEA

Brief: Pan-European brand campaign

Agency: Wieden & Kennedy Amsterdam

Writer: Jimmy Smith

Art director: Paul Shearer

Director: Charles Randolph-Wright

Production company: @radical.media New York

Exposure: TV and cinema

INNOCENT DRINKS

Project: Innocent Smoothies

Client: Richard Reed, marketing director

Brief: Communicate that Innocent is a company that doesn't mess about

with nature

Agency: Fallon

Writer: Andy McLeod

Art director: Richard Flintham

Typographer: James Townsend

Photographer: Craig Brandt

Exposure: National 48-sheets

IKEA

Project: Glasgow Ikea opening

Client: Frances Evans, brand communication manager

Brief: Announce the opening of Ikea in Glasgow

Agency: St Luke's

Writers: Matt Janes and Vic Polkinghorne

Art directors: Matt Janes and Vic Polkinghorne

Director: Colin Gregg

Production company: Stark Films

Exposure: Scottish TV

RIGHT TO READ

Project: Right to Read

Client: Steve Auckland, chairman

Brief: Recruit adult reading volunteers

Agency: Brahm

Writer: Joe Coleman

Art director: Paul Nichols

Director: Graham Hector

Production company: The Gate

Exposure: Cinema

NESTLE

Project: Nestle Foods Snack Stops

Client: Nathan Smith, senior category manager

Brief: Launch Snack Stops among 18- to 25-year-olds

Agency: McCann-Erickson London

Writers: Rick Kent and Barney Hobson

Art directors: Rick Kent and Barney Hobson

Director: Steve Bendelack

Production company: Baby

Exposure: Satellite and terrestrial TV, cinema

THOMAS PINK

Project: Two-fold 170s shirt range

Client: Andrew Wiles, marketing director

Brief: Launch the two-fold 170s range

Agency: M&C Saatchi

Writer: Mark Goodwin

Art director: Tiger Savage

Typographer: Dan Smith

Photogrpaher: Richard Burridge

Exposure: Press and posters in New York, London and Europe



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