Private view

So we’re done with Euro 96, and at the end of it I have three distinct memories: Italy’s ridiculous self-destruction; the ugly Bulgarians (who would have been beaten by England in the ugly stakes, had they played Fowler, Beardsley and Le Tissier); and the whole coachload of crap football-related ads that you get bombarded with at half time.

So we’re done with Euro 96, and at the end of it I have three distinct

memories: Italy’s ridiculous self-destruction; the ugly Bulgarians (who

would have been beaten by England in the ugly stakes, had they played

Fowler, Beardsley and Le Tissier); and the whole coachload of crap

football-related ads that you get bombarded with at half time.



Oddly enough, the last time I did this was in ’94 when the World Cup was

on. So, I couldn’t wait to do Private View again, and just like Euro 96,

I have to say it wasn’t a great one.



The Turkey of the tournament is the duty free work for British Airports

Authority.



The reason Turkey went home early was that they just lacked that

creative spark, and I think the same can be said of these ads. The brief

was really, really simple and it sort of required really, really simple

executions, not the 3-5-3 christmas tree/diamond/sweeper formation.



The mind-your-language style foreign actors lifted it a little, but

ultimately not enough.



Adidas is Italy. It’s got the biggest football stars in the world, and

didn’t do anything of much consequence with them either, however, the

ads were beautifully shot, something that the Italian team should be

(cymbal crash goes here). I really like the idea of centring each ad on

the players’ nicknames, e.g. Sammer of Germany is Firehead (he’s a

gingah, you see), Hierro of Spain is the Locomotive (strong) and

Gascoigne is the Magician (I always thought his nickname was Fat Boy

Whiskey Face Mars-Bar Arse). The only thing I can never understand is

why sports shoe ads always look the same, everyone uses global sporting

superstars so someone needs to do something different to stand out. They

promised everything but overall a bit disappointing.



Tennent’s next, or shall we say Denmark. Past champions now sadly

looking a little lacklustre. It’s Romeo and Juliet with a man and his

pint. He takes us through a variety of shots of him ‘lovin’’ his pint,

but Guinness, I think, did it better. Tennent’s have done original

corkers in the past, and this isn’t by any means a rotter, but we all

know it is capable of better.



The Firearms Amnesty stuff looked great: very different, a bit like

Croatia.



If you had to describe the Croatians you’d say: ‘You know they had that

great kit...and erm...erm...’ and the thing I remember most is the art

direction of these ads, which I thought was great. It is such a powerful

subject that simplicity of communication may have been better than

getting too clever clever with the line - the target market here is a

geezer in a tower block oos got a sawn orf shootah in the back seat of

his Transit van and does capers up the Befnal Green Road, not an

advertising awards jury.



The poster for the Times was like Holland - good heritage but just a

little dull on the day. It’s talking to football junkies. If it was

advertising the joys of heroin, would it have been more stimulating

creatively? Football is allegedly much better than heroin and it’s more

expensive, surely it could have been a bit more exciting.



Because Euro 96 was played over here, I selected the Glaxo ads

masquerading as England to go up the steps and shake hands with the

Queen (sadly, not to be). They show really great images of very

unpleasant diseases, and then tell us reassuringly that Glaxo wants to

rid the world of them. They are beautifully shot and there’s a nice

cheeky bit at the end of each one to illustrate the idea further. It

would have been nice to get a bit more about Glaxo than the fact that it

hates diseases, but easily the most striking work in an otherwise

average tournament.



Sorry.



Dave Buonaguidi is the joint creative director of St Luke’s



News International

Project: The Times

Client: not supplied

Brief: not supplied

Agency: Rainey Kelly Campbell Roalfe

Writer: not supplied

Art director: not supplied

Photographer: not supplied

Typographer: not supplied

Exposure: not supplied



British Airports Authority



Project: Heathrow, Gatwick, Stansted

Client: Claire Hewitt, group retail marketing director

Brief: Convince UK holiday makers to shop at the airport

Agency: Bates Dorland

Writer: Stef Jones

Art director: Tom Burnay

Director: David Hartley

Production company: Academy

Exposure: Carlton, LWT, Meridian and Channel 4



Home Office



Project: Firearms Amnesty

Client: Charles Skinner, head of information

Brief: Publicise the Government’s firearms amnesty

Agency: Euro RSCG Wnek Gosper

Writer: Matt Bartley

Art director: Kiki Kendrick

Photographer: Robert Clifford

Typographer: Dave Jenner

Exposure: Press



Tennent Caledonian Breweries



Project: Tennent’s lager

Client: Mark Hunter, director of brands, Scotland

Brief: Show the passionate relationship a person has with their pint of

Tennent’s lager

Agency: The Leith Agency

Writer: Dougal Wilson

Art director: Gareth Howells

Director: Kristian Levring

Production company: Blarke Sonne, Levring A/S

Exposure: Scottish regional TV and cable



Glaxo Wellcome



Project: Corporate

Client: Philip Connolly, corporate manager

Brief: Show Glaxo as a leader in the fight against disease

Agency: M&C Saatchi

Writers: James Lowther, Richard Dean

Art director: Martha Riley

Director: Peter Darrell

Production company: Oxford Scientific Films

Exposure: London and Meridian TV



Adidas



Project: Predator and Traxim soccer boots

Client: Tom Noble, brand communication manager

Brief: Show Adidas as a leader in soccer boot innovation

Agency: Leagas Delaney

Writers: Kim Papsworth, Dave Beverley, Will Farquhar

Art directors: Tony Davidson, Rob Burley, Ian Ducker

Directors: Rob Sanders (Helen Langridge Associates), Kinka Usher (Usher

and Associates), Jerry Hibbert (Hibbert Ralph), Mehdi Norowzian (Joy

Films)

Exposure: National and European TV



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