PRIVATE VIEW

My three-year-old daughter is helping me look at this week’s ads. OK, she can’t read or write, but on the plus side, at least she isn’t ’motivated by a desire to have a go at one’s peers’ (Campaign’s warning to would-be Private View hacks). However, being a Delaney, she knows what she likes: furry animals, bright colours and a marketing strategy that is encapsulated in a pithy consumer proposition that is utterly single-minded. I know that this last ingredient is important because if it’s missing she wrinkles up her nose in distaste and runs out of the room. She and I have a lot in common.

My three-year-old daughter is helping me look at this week’s ads.

OK, she can’t read or write, but on the plus side, at least she isn’t

’motivated by a desire to have a go at one’s peers’ (Campaign’s warning

to would-be Private View hacks). However, being a Delaney, she knows

what she likes: furry animals, bright colours and a marketing strategy

that is encapsulated in a pithy consumer proposition that is utterly

single-minded. I know that this last ingredient is important because if

it’s missing she wrinkles up her nose in distaste and runs out of the

room. She and I have a lot in common.



The nose remained delightfully wrinkle-free during the Quaker Quick and

Hearty commercial (who thinks of these names?). You know, the ad with

the furry animals and the bright colours. I asked her what she thought

of it. She liked it and wanted to see it again. ’What was it for?’ I

asked.



’Cereal’, she replied with utter certainty. After two more showings she

was able to recall the name of the product: Quaky Quicken Harpy. She

also recited the punch line: ’Tom! Don’t be an animal!’ It could catch

on.



The BT commercial, on the other hand, was less immediately appealing to

us. It helped when I worked out that the characters were all from

EastEnders. They are being paid to pretend they’re all ringing each

other up for a get together because BT is offering cheap calls to

friends and family. Unfortunately, there were no furry animals. (That

rat, Dirty Den, doesn’t count.)



My daughter wanted to know why all the people in the Thomson CityBreaks

ads looked so sad. ’Ah,’ said I, ’that’s what we grown-ups call

irony.



You see, by showing a boring person who has never been anywhere nice, it

makes interesting people want to go to that nice place.’ ’Why not show

that nice place?’ she asked. ’You sound just like a client,’ I

replied.



There was a nice, furry animal in the Ford Explorer ad. It was a large

dog, gambolling in the waves, enjoying quality time with its

American-style owner. The kind of quality time delivered by the

aforementioned 4x4 vehicle. ’Though this is, in fact, a generic

benefit,’ I explained. ’Some products attempt to ’annexe the generic’ in

order to claim ownership of a particular position or emotional benefit

for themselves.’ My daughter remained silent, aware perhaps that since

her dad does the Jeep ads, anything she said might be interpreted as

’having a go at one’s peers’.



The First Direct ads had nice, happy music and they were fun to watch:

an unbeatable combination, whatever your age. We both readily understood

them too. The first one had Bob Mortimer queue-jumping, to show that, at

First Direct, there are no queues, and the other one had Bob sitting on

a merry-go-round that wouldn’t go round because it was closed - unlike

good old First Direct. Unquestionably the best ads for a bank that we

have both seen for some time.



And then there was my personal favourite, for Royal Mail stamps. Two

Chinese chefs, one wielding a large Chinese meat clever (a thwok) are

discussing, as you do, the wives of King Henry VIII. ’Beheaded,

survived.



Beheaded, died.’ ’No, no ... divorced, beheaded, died. Divorced,

beheaded, survived.’ Admirably simple, funny, well acted and directed,

it was a great way to promote the new issue of stamps with all six

wives’ heads on. I wanted to ask my daughter what she thought, but she’d

already wrinkled her nose and run out. There’s no pleasing some

people.



Royal Mail

Project: Philately, King Henry VIII

Client: Alistair Sharp, head of philately marketing

Brief: Position stamp collecting as a contemporary activity and generate

interest and purchase of the latest issue

Agency: Bates Dorland Writer: Roland Hafenrichter

Art director: Nils Andersson

Director: Simon Cheek

Production company: BFCS

Exposure: National TV

BT

Project: Friends and family

Client: Sholto Douglas-Home, advertising manager

Brief: Launch the friends and family increase in numbers from five to

ten

Agency: Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO

Writer: Alfredo Marcantonio

Art director: Peter Gausis

Director: Mandie Fletcher

Production company: Fletcher Sanderson Films

Exposure: National TV

Ford UK

Project: Explorer

Client: Brian Wade, manager, special projects

Brief: Get an Explorer, get a life

Agency: Ogilvy and Mather

Writer: Alun Howell

Art director: Marcus Vinton

Photographer: Herb Ritts Typographer: Chris Priest

Exposure: National press and posters

First Direct

Project: Branding

Client: Mike Phillipson, brand communications manager

Brief: Establish that First Direct is a telephone bank open 24-hours a

day and consequently has no queues

Agency: WCRS

Writer: Larry Barker

Art director: Rooney Carruthers

Director: Mike Stevenson

Production company: Paul Weiland Film Company

Exposure: National TV

Quaker Limited

Project: Quick and Hearty

Client: Jeff Cowell, client supervisor

Brief: Launch a contemporary variant while drawing on porridge values

Agency: Young and Rubicam

Writer: Paul Catmur

Art director: Anita Davis

Director: Mark Denton

Production company: Brian Byfield Films

Exposure: National TV

Thomson Tour Operations

Project: CityBreaks

Client: Anna White, general manager

Brief: Raise awareness of Thomson CityBreaks

Agency: BMP DDB

Writer: Mike Boles

Art director: Jerry Hollens Photographers: Martin Parr (’cafe’), Marc

Riboud (’living room’), Graham Cornthwaite (’hairdresser’)

Exposure: National 48-sheet posters



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1 Job description: Digital marketing executive

Digital marketing executives oversee the online marketing strategy for their organisation. They plan and execute digital (including email) marketing campaigns and design, maintain and supply content for the organisation's website(s).