PRIVATE VIEW

It’s amazing how quickly we’ve become blase about the power of special effects. Fact is, they’re not special anymore. Nonetheless, I couldn’t help but be in awe of what can be achieved these days while judging this bunch of ads: a pack of rats charging with squeaking sincerity over a cliff, the wobbling high diver suspended with bum-clenching veracity, and a team of golden racing cars whisking through the innards of an engine at speeds that make you blink with belief.

It’s amazing how quickly we’ve become blase about the power of

special effects. Fact is, they’re not special anymore. Nonetheless, I

couldn’t help but be in awe of what can be achieved these days while

judging this bunch of ads: a pack of rats charging with squeaking

sincerity over a cliff, the wobbling high diver suspended with

bum-clenching veracity, and a team of golden racing cars whisking

through the innards of an engine at speeds that make you blink with

belief.



The computer-animated spot for Mobil 1 is so beautifully executed you

want to rewind it to see just how it was done. In terms of the idea, I

feel



a bit ungenerous to recall the Castrol Liquid



Engineering campaign, but didn’t they do one where the golden oil drop

was torture tested in



an engine? Still, it’s a spot you’d be hard pressed to miss.



Also from WCRS and a similarly well put together piece of techno

wizardry, we have Lottery Instants. By freezing people mid-action,

another technique well beloved of pop video



directors, we are allowed to consider a variety of



outcomes open to our hero - the highboard wobbler. Will he get the girl,

the celebratory



bubbly or the guffaws of the gang? As the endline so teasingly puts it:

’Anything can happen in an instant.’ Neat, well branded, entertaining,

but will it win a prize? You takes your chances.



One campaign I feel should be weighed down with the gongs is Bartle

Bogle Hegarty’s spot for Lynx. For my money, no agency has ever come

within a mile of BBH for sheer understated



sexiness. It manages to impart a gloss and oomph to its films that often

leaves the Sultans of Cool on the awards juries turning their snouts up

but leaves everyone else from students to secretaries drooling for

more.



This modern re-working of the Pied Piper story continues pin-up casting

with pinned down plotting. The story moves sharply and effortlessly,

driven by a great track from Bentley Rhythm Ace. Like the fantastically

directed and sexy



’sisters of Murphy’s’ ads from the same agency, it will probably pick up

more votes in Camberwell than Cannes. Pity.



If Lynx looks like it was shot in a Hollywood



studio, Renault Megane from Publicis looks like it was shot where the

studio executives have lunch. When reviewers of films by former

advertising



directors say this is obviously a film by a ’former advertising

director’, this is the style they mean.



The commercial, which follows a Courtney Love and Dave Stewart-type

couple eating a very public zen lunch, oozes style, drips money, belches

glamour but is about as sexy as ... well ... Courtney Love and Dave

Stewart. Having said that, I dare say it will work its Gucci-clad butt

off.



Court Burkitt & Co’s Archers plot is a neat, out of focus, offering

based on the conceit of words like ’wager’ and ’tactics’ having an ’a’

in them like ’A’rchers does. The visual effect of observing women

pulling rather bitchy strokes on blokes through frosted glass has an

oddly intoxicating effect - a bit like Archers really.



So, shall we Tango? Let’s be honest, a fat orange man slapping a bloke

in the face is a tough act to follow. So they didn’t follow. Instead,

HHCL & Partners took a back-road off surrealism’s highway and crashed

its van into the suburban front room of a very near cousin of Alison

Steadman in Abigail’s Party. The dialogue is very Mike Leigh, the action

very Ealing comedy. It’s still intrusive



advertising, but what happened to the strategy of the taste smacking you

in the mouth? Sadly, not my cup of Tango.



Tim Mellors is executive creative director at Grey



Elida Faberge

Project: Lynx

Client: Patrick Cairns, marketing manager

Brief: Communicate the core brand message that Lynx

helps you get the girl

Agency: Bartle Bogle Hegarty

Writer: Marc Hatfield

Art director: Peter Bradly

Director: Harold Zwart

Production company: Pink

Exposure: Cinema, national and satellite TV

Britvic Soft Drinks

Project: Tango

Client: Lucinda Semark, marketing manager, Tango

Brief: Make Tango our national drink

Agency: HHCL & Partners

Creative team: Lee Tan, Jonathan Thake

Director: Declan Lowney

Production company:

Tomboy Films

Exposure: National TV

Renault

Project: Renault Megane

Client: Tim Mack, director

of communications

Brief: Launch the Megane

as the safest car in its class

Agency: Publicis

Writer: Rob Janowski

Art director: Keith Courtney

Director: Olivier Venturini

Production company: Godman

Exposure: National TV

Camelot

Project: Lottery Instants

Client: Ian Milligan,

marketing director

Brief: Dramatise the fun

and possibilities of playing Lottery Instants

Agency: WCRS

Writer: Steve Little

Art director: Tim Robertson

Director: Simon Levene

Production company: Pink

Exposure: National TV, radio

UDV

Project: Archers

Client: Deborah Wood,

senior brand manager

Brief: Establish Archers as an integral part of a good night out

Agency: Court Burkitt & Co

Writer: Iain Hunter

Art director: Marie Goodwin

Director: Pedro Romanyi

Production company: Outsider

Exposure: National TV

Mobil

Project: Mobil 1

Client: Bruce Turner, European communications manager

Brief: Generate excitement and interest in Mobil 1 by demonstrating its

superiority

Agency: WCRS

Writers: Will Barnett,

Jamie Bell

Art directors: Russell Garn, Mike Wells

Director: Gerard de Thame

Production company:

Gerard de Thame Films

Exposure: National/satellite and pan-European TV