PRIVATE VIEW

A year has passed since my last Private View, during which time I’ve been struck by the general fuss and bother about titles in our business. They seem to be terribly important, yet everybody you speak to denies this when questioned directly. However, judging by the column inches devoted to them in this very organ, people aren’t being entirely truthful. So, with that in mind, I decided to pay particular attention to what the ads are called.

A year has passed since my last Private View, during which time I’ve

been struck by the general fuss and bother about titles in our business.

They seem to be terribly important, yet everybody you speak to denies

this when questioned directly. However, judging by the column inches

devoted to them in this very organ, people aren’t being entirely

truthful. So, with that in mind, I decided to pay particular attention

to what the ads are called.



First up is a TV spot for Boddingtons enticingly titled, ‘whipped

cream’. With shaking hands, I insert the cassette. The commercial does

not disappoint, though it takes a more humorous approach to discipline

than one might have expected. As Mike Flowers excruciatingly warbles his

way through Englebert Humperdinck’s old bondage anthem, Please Release

me, a nice young man has a series of encounters in a fetish club, before

having his pint of Boddingtons literally whipped away from him by a bird

in a rubber cat-suit. It’s enjoyable stuff, but not quite as neat as

some of its predecessors.



Renault Megane offers ‘Friday night’ and ‘belt up’. I don’t know what to

expect, but get a couple of ads featuring a bloke in conversation with

his car. I have often noticed people in cars apparently chattering away

to themselves. Now I realise that they are not mad but merely having a

relationship with their motor. I expected the voice of the intriguingly

named Megane to be female and Welsh. It is neither, and, in fact, sounds

suspiciously like the little boy in the Safeway ads. I hope the poor lad

hasn’t got himself locked in the glove compartment. Actually, these ads

are by no means as iffy as they could have been, though, as Pete Mathews

pointed out, in the old days you knew where you were with talking cars

because the bonnets used to move up and down when they spoke.



The next cassette, entitled ‘Brains Bitter. Bob and Eddie. English

version’, tells us that we are still dealing with matters Welsh. An

engagingly inept B movie sci-fi parody on behalf of Brains SA. This fine

South Wales brew is known locally as ‘skull attack’, which may explain

why the aliens, when asked the question ‘Do you come in peace?’, give

the immortal response, ‘No we come to drink your brains’. All good,

clean fun, and I can only look forward to the Welsh language version.



Now a cassette for Madame Tussaud’s - title, ‘candle power’. No

surprises here. It’s 60 seconds of candles (candlewax, waxworks, get

it?) - lots of different ones that represent characters you can see at

Madame T’s. There’s humour, a bit of topicality and even some political

satire as the candles morph their way through the different characters.

It’s got an idea and it’s deftly done, but why does Hugh Grant’s candle

only get covered in kisses when it should have been blown out?



Last cassette, label reads ‘UK Gold. Tennis, Alvin, Bullet.’ They’re not

giving much away. What we get is three little chunks of cheese from the

over-ripe section that was the 70s audio-visual scene. There’s a bit of

that electronic ping pong, an exquisitely naff ad featuring Alvin

Stardust trying to prevent children throwing themselves under double-

decker buses and a beautifully off advertorial about ‘male grooming’,

complete with tank-tops and lime-green ‘Y’-fronts. The gist of the

campaign is that when games, ads and blokes were as dodgy as this, the

TV programmes had to be good. It’s an engaging strategy, quite nicely

executed. The advertorial is so blissfully cheesy that I begin to wonder

if it is, in fact, the real McCoy. I would love to know.



One poster remains in the bag. Print work doesn’t seem to have a title

until it is considered for an award. This is an elegant and witty

execution for the Economist, though perhaps not as thought-provoking as

some others. However, I’m sure that it will get itself a title in due

course.



Nick Welch is a creative director at Ammirati Puris Lintas



Brains SA

Project: Brains SA

Client: Louise Prynne, marketing and development manager

Brief: Raise the profile of Brains SA on a national scale

Agency: Maher Bird Associates

Writer: Steve Deput

Art director: Steve Deput

Director: Lloyd Stanton

Production company: AVA Films

Exposure: Regional TV



Whitbread

Project: Boddingtons

Client: Stuart MacFarlane, brand manager

Brief: Broaden the brand’s appeal to a younger audience

Agency: Bartle Bogle Hegarty

Writer: Bruce Crouch

Art director: Graham Watson

Director: Daniel Barber

Production company: Rose Hackney Barber

Exposure: National TV



Renault

Project: Renault Megane

Client: Phil Horton, director of communications

Brief: Launch the Renault Megane

Agency: Publicis

Writer: Tago Byers

Art director: Mel Williams

Director: Richard Loncraine

Production company: James Garrett

Exposure: National TV



Pearson

Project: The Economist

Client: Chantal Hughes, marketing manager

Brief: Provide a motivating, hard-hitting, emotional reason to buy the

Economist

Agency: Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO

Writer: Mary Wear

Art director: Damon Collins

Typographer: Damon Collins

Exposure: Posters in London and the South-east



UK Gold

Project: UK Gold

Client: Ian Riley, marketing director

Brief: Develop a fresh, humorous campaign

Agency: GGT

Writer: Alan Moseley

Art director: Graham Cappi

Director: Daniel Kleinman

Production company: Limelight

Exposure: National TV



Tussaud’s Group

Project: Madame Tussaud’s

Client: Nancy Mitchell, marketing manager

Brief: Show how entertaining London’s leading tourist attraction is

Agency: J. Walter Thompson

Writer: Trevor De Silva

Art director: Paul White

Director: Michael Wright

Production company: Elm Road

Exposure: Cinema



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Digital marketing executives oversee the online marketing strategy for their organisation. They plan and execute digital (including email) marketing campaigns and design, maintain and supply content for the organisation's website(s).