PRIVATE VIEW

It’s the morning after the night before. And, as the night before was Creative Circle, you can imagine how I feel. Creative Circle was the usual fascinating bash. People who hadn’t won complained about how they could have produced the winners (but they didn’t, did they?). People who won draped themselves over creative directors from other agencies. Generous applause for popular winners like the immensely brilliant Polo price campaign.

It’s the morning after the night before. And, as the night before

was Creative Circle, you can imagine how I feel. Creative Circle was the

usual fascinating bash. People who hadn’t won complained about how they

could have produced the winners (but they didn’t, did they?). People who

won draped themselves over creative directors from other agencies.

Generous applause for popular winners like the immensely brilliant Polo

price campaign.



How I love this business of ours.



One of the things I don’t like about doing Private View is that Campaign

always tells you where the work came from. An agency’s reputation can’t

help but influence your opinion of its work. For instance, if DMB&B does

something brilliant, it gets marked down, whereas AMV’s less good work

basks in the agency’s reflected glory, to some extent.



Anyway, what of the work? Well, I’ve really, really tried to be nice.

But God, it’s been difficult.



Sunday Business has a very pretty ad showing the City at rest. The

message here is that if you actually think Sunday is a day of rest

’you’re already a day behind’.



All well and good but the ad left me with no clear sense of why Sunday

Business is better, or indeed different, from the Sunday Times. At least

with the Sunday Times you get comprehensive business journalism and nine

other sections to browse through when you aren’t working. But the film

is beautifully shot.



The new BP commercial has a little boy writing an imaginary letter to BP

asking why it doesn’t have petrol stations inside trucks so you can do

your shopping on the petrol station truck without having to stop

moving.



An imaginary man from BP answers the letter by saying that no, they

don’t have trucks with petrol stations on, but they do have petrol

stations with shops so you can go shopping. You have to stop your car

but, who knows, one day you may have petrol stations on trucks. The

endline is: ’We keep you moving’, which is exactly what I intend to do.

Although the little boy in the ad is very sweet.



Eagle Star is visually fresh and distinctive. Which makes it even more

disappointing that the script illustrates one of the hoariest old

chestnuts in financial advertising. Yes, it’s chickens hatching out of -

wait for it - nest eggs! But at least ... er ... um ...



Hallmark is very proud of its new ad. So proud that the film, called

’teardrop’, is preceded by a really interesting documentary. This gives

insights into how the film was made. For example, the ad does not rely

on natural light - electric lighting was used. The rain that bucketed

down was not real but created by rainmaking machines. The documentary

appears to target the Hallmark salesforce and the parents of the

creatives involved. As for the film itself, it’s a noble attempt to do

something we British have never been very good at: schmaltz. In the US,

Hallmark advertising has been based on sentiment for 40 years and has

been wildly successful. In this country, we never seem able to go for it

in a big enough way. The commercial did bring a lump to my throat - but

not the sort the agency had in mind, I suspect. On the other hand, the

leading man is well cast.



The latest Audi offering shows a page of the London A-Z projected on to

the new model. The ad tells you that ’the Knowledge’ is a standard

feature on the latest Audi thanks to an advanced satellite navigation

system. I know nothing about cars, so the message didn’t do much for

me.



However, I admire Audi’s campaign so, while this isn’t the greatest Audi

ad ever, it’s my favourite in this week’s selection.



I thought at first glance that the Harley-Davidson campaign was for

Irn-Bru. It’s for one of the most exciting bikes in the world yet, in

its nostalgic ’if only’ tone, it seems close to many other campaigns for

cars and even (heaven forbid) for Chivas Regal. But what do I know?

It’ll probably clean up at next year’s Creative Circle.





Audi

Project: Audi A8

Client: Neil Burrows, marketing director

Brief: Audi is the world’s most progressive car company

Agency: Bartle Bogle Hegarty

Writer: Jeremy Carr

Art director: Tony McTear

Photographer: Jack Bankhead

Typographer: Andy Bird

Exposure: National press

Eagle Star

Project: Relaunch campaign

Client: Steve Wigzell, marketing director

Brief: Relaunch Eagle Star as a no-nonsense provider of insurance and

pensions

Agency: Ogilvy & Mather

Writer: Mark Fairbanks

Art director: Mike Barker

Director: Chris Shepherd

Production company: Bermuda Shorts

Exposure: Regional TV

BP

Project: Brand image programme

Client: not supplied

Brief: BP enables its customers to get on with their lives by keeping

them moving

Agency: Doner Cardwell Hawkins

Writer: Mike Sullivan

Art director: Gary Wolfson

Director: Joe Johnson

Production company: Industrial Light & Magic

Exposure: Regional TV

Sunday Business

Project: Launch campaign

Client: Bert Hardy, chief executive, European

Press Holdings

Brief: Demonstrate to top business people that Sunday Business will help

inform all their business decisions in the week ahead

Agency: DMB&B

Writer: Roger Holdsworth

Art director: Phil Chitty

Director: Chris Hartwill

Production company: RSA Films

Exposure: Regional TV - London and Meridian

Harley-Davidson

Project: European campaign

Client: Michael van der Sande, European marketing director

Brief: ’Live for today’

Agency: Partners BDDH

Writer: Owen Lee

Art director: Gary Robinson

Photographer: Malcolm Venville

Typographer: Jason Ellis

Exposure: European national press and consumer magazines

Hallmark Cards UK

Project: Cards/branding

Client: By Arganbright, group marketing director UK

Brief: Hallmark helps us express our feelings

Agency: Leo Burnett

Writer: Nick Bell

Art director: Mark Tutssell

Director: Michael Seresin

Production company: BFCS

Exposure: National TV