Private View

’Many a mickle,’ as we don’t say here, ’makes a muckle.’ Or as Ken Mullen once said in a financial ad: ’Watch the mickles and the muckles will take care of themselves.’ Appropriately enough, it’s always been the way of the Edinburgh school of advertising that mickles should indeed be taken care of, and work should always follow the Stephen King adage that ’if you can’t outspend the competition, out-think them’.

’Many a mickle,’ as we don’t say here, ’makes a muckle.’ Or as Ken

Mullen once said in a financial ad: ’Watch the mickles and the muckles

will take care of themselves.’ Appropriately enough, it’s always been

the way of the Edinburgh school of advertising that mickles should

indeed be taken care of, and work should always follow the Stephen King

adage that ’if you can’t outspend the competition, out-think them’.



All but one of this week’s selection follows this rule, with a great

deal of thought going into the ideas and not just a battle of style over

content.



The biggest budget is undoubtedly the cinema commercial for Gordon’s Gin

which, although very reminiscent of Levi’s ’pool hall’, has a great

sequence of bubble billiards in the glass of refreshing G&T. It

refreshes the parts of our defeated player so much that he bets all his

money on a game to win the pool hall itself.



My biggest problem with the ad is: do Levi-wearing hustlers drink G&Ts

or can Gordon’s realistically broaden its appeal to a younger market?

Maybe that’s what old Hurricane Higgins has been sipping all these

years.



The Army recruitment campaign, as we all know, is not only thoughtfully

done but even makes us punters think. This week’s quiz is: who gets the

blanket? Even without phoning a friend, I got this one. So maybe the

next question should be tougher. Faulds resident and ex-Guardsman,

Charlie, dismissed the ad as nonsense. ’Eat the blanket and drive on,’

he thought.



But it’s still a good ad in a great campaign.



As I unrolled the Penguin posters, I wasn’t sure whether they were for

French Connection, for birds or biscuits. But I found them very

elegantly expressed thoughts for a great brand of books. I particularly

liked the copyrighted alphabet and hope they do more. Like Gordon’s, I’d

query the brief as I’m not really convinced people will buy books

because of the publisher, despite such a classic logo standing out on

the book shelves.



The current masters of ’out-thinking’ are probably Richard Flintham and

Andy McLeod and they’ve done it again. While everyone sees a series of

Economist-type posters suggesting that Loaded is now perhaps a more

serious business read, us chaps in the know have already read a letter

in the gents from the Loaded editor.



It explains that some readers have complained about getting nasty looks

from all ’n’ sundry when reading the magazine, so the posters are

running to convince people that Loaded has turned over a new leaf. Now I

can enjoy the 61st issue featuring the Welsh Secretary in a State,

Catherine Zeta Jones, without so much as a second glance from all those

Daily Mail readers.



Dulux colour also gives us something to think about as we see a couple

meet on a double-decker bus. She doesn’t fancy him, though, just a bit

of his hood as a colour reference for her wall. A great idea,

beautifully done, with even the old sheep dog looking refreshed in

yellow, all seemlessly executed.



Having worked on chocolate since Nestle was Rowntree Macintosh, I know

how hard it can be to make chocolates feel contemporary. Maltesers feel

like they’ve been around for ever, so a great deal of work was needed to

out-think their competition. The latest TV ads are brilliant. They are

simple, engaging ads that have so much charm in the idea and the

direction that they could almost have been done by John Webster

himself.



I particularly like the deft blow job on the sofa. But if I were being

very, very picky, I’d have to say the ads are so well-branded that the

end-frame packshot does seem heavy-handed and perhaps unnecessary.



Still, as our Dennis Chester would say, they certainly got their muckles

worth.



Billy Mawhinney is the creative director at Faulds Advertising



Penguin Books UK

Project: Penguin brand

Client: John Bond,

marketing director

Brief: Refresh the Penguin brand

Agency: Mustoe Merriman Herring Levy

Writer: Simon Hipwell

Art director: Dean Hunt

Typography: Unreal

Exposure: Press, posters

UDV

Project: Gordon’s Gin

Client: Mark Jaffe,

senior brand manager

Brief: Invigoration

Agency: Leo Burnett

Writer: Zane Radcliffe

Art director: Mike Oughton

Director: Malcolm Venville

Production company: Malcolm Venville

Exposure: Cinema, national TV

COI

Project: Army recruitment

Clients: Colonel Rory Clayton, Army Recruiting Group; Marc Michaels,

group head

Brief: Involve the general public in the challenge of

an Army career

Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi

Writer: Howard Wilmott

Art director: Duncan Marshall

Director: Paul Gay

Production company: Outsider

Exposure: National TV

Mars Confectionery

Project: Maltesers

Client: Bob Morrison, European franchise director

Brief: Tap into the playfulness of Maltesers

Agency: DMB&B

Writer: Trevor Webb

Art director: Steve Campbell

Director: David Hartley

Production company:

Brave Films

Exposure: National TV

IPC Magazines

Project: Loaded

Client: Robert Tame, publishing director

Brief: Give Loaded readers

an alibi

Agency: Fallon McElligott

Writer: Andy McLeod

Art director: Richard Flintham

Typographer: Andy Dymock

Exposure: Posters

ICI

Project: Dulux colour

Clients: Rainer Schubert, senior product manager; Magdalena Teare,

marketing director

Brief: Establish Dulux’s colour credentials by promoting its superior

colour offering

Agency: Abbott Mead

Vickers BBDO

Writer: Nick Worthington

Art director: Paul Brazier

Director: Paul Gay

Production company: Outsider

Exposure: National TV