Private View

I am viewing this new crop of ads from the familiar comfort of my bedroom, in which I’ve been held captive for over a week, due to a football injury resulting in surgery on my right shoulder. Therefore, I’ll try to make this review as constructive as possible and not merely say that everything is brilliant, wonderful and beautiful, which I could be inclined to do as I’m pumped full of morphine-type painkillers. So if those responsible for the following commercials take offence at anything I’m about to write, please go easy on me if you see me in the street as I’m unable to defend myself - but I can still run quickly.

I am viewing this new crop of ads from the familiar comfort of my

bedroom, in which I’ve been held captive for over a week, due to a

football injury resulting in surgery on my right shoulder. Therefore,

I’ll try to make this review as constructive as possible and not merely

say that everything is brilliant, wonderful and beautiful, which I could

be inclined to do as I’m pumped full of morphine-type painkillers. So if

those responsible for the following commercials take offence at anything

I’m about to write, please go easy on me if you see me in the street as

I’m unable to defend myself - but I can still run quickly.



Using celebrities to help sell a product has been successful on many

occasions but the Sainsbury’s campaign starring John Cleese doesn’t

really work for me. It must have been quite intimidating for the people

laden with the task of coming up with an idea that can compete with the

high standard of the previous work for this brand.



I can see how a simple idea, which they had, could have been enhanced by

using a powerful and humorous personality such as John Cleese, but his

comedy routine and antics just seem a bit tired and unsurprising.



I think it was Tom Carty or Walter Campbell who said the test of how

good an idea is, is how much you wish you’d done it yourself. This new

ad for British Airways evokes that sensation. It’s a piece of film that,

once upon a time, only the Americans could get away with. The visual

game of people watching or, in this case, kids watching, is something

that we all participate in and has been brilliantly brought to life.

You’re left feeling charmed by the kids and with a sense of endearment

towards the brand. I’d be amazed if this doesn’t work strongly for

everyone concerned.



We now come to the campaign for the Co-op. This cheap and cheerful,

tongue-in-cheek, slapstick, bright and bubbly, cheeky chappie of an ad

campaign is strongly branded and some made me laugh out loud, which

isn’t that difficult in my present state. However, after watching all

ten in succession, they did start to grate and I did have a strong

compulsion to eat my own head - let’s hope some crazy media buyer isn’t

looking for this effect.



The next ad, for the Times, is one of those commercials that, half-way

through, I found myself thinking, ’I think I like this, so please don’t

disappoint me with a bad pun or something unpleasant at the end.’ But

I’m happy to say this tight and well-crafted idea doesn’t appear to have

any faults. The concept of owning insights to anything from Ian Wright

to the Millennium Dome for only 30p is a brilliant one. It makes you

think about the product in a new way and also adds worth to the brand -

all that for less than a packet of Quavers.



Again, I love the idea for BMW, but when I came to write up my notes I

couldn’t remember what car the ad was for, which may say more about my

drug-hindered memory than the ad, but I felt the execution could have

been a little more intriguing and adventurous. Within an ad break, I

feel this commercial will disappear. This is a nice ad which could have

been great - shame.



Finally, the Faces to Watch press ads for Sekonda. At first glance, my

wife, while under the influence of a more commonly used drug - alcohol -

said: ’Cool, a gay campaign!’. After trying to convince her otherwise, I

came to the conclusion it probably would have been a stronger campaign

if it was. I can see where the people involved had tapped into a format

which is often used in magazines - a clever wordplay can help marry the

element of a watch and a future celebrity - but I can’t say I’m a great

fan of word play and this looks pretty weak typographically, especially

when dealing with designer mags which is where, I would have thought,

these will be running.



But what do I know, I’m on drugs.



BMW

Project: 3 Series

Client: Phil Horton,

marketing director

Brief: Launch the 3 Series - the reinvention of the sports saloon

Agency: WCRS

Writer: Andy Brittain

Art director: Yu King

Director: Nick Lewin

Production company:

Cowboy Films

Exposure: National TV

Co-operative Retail Services

Project: Co-operative

Retail Services

Client: Tim Marsden, marketing operations controller

Brief: Reassure people that there’s always a good deal at Co-op

Agency: Duckworth Finn

Grubb Waters Writer: Simon Riley

Art director: Tim Brown

Director: Mark Denton Production company: Godman

Exposure: National TV

British Airways

Project: British Airways

Client: Jill Manaton, senior manager, marketing communications

Brief: Use product benefits and services to demonstrate the attitude of

the brand

Agency: M&C Saatchi

Writer: Simon Dicketts

Art director: Peter Gatley

Director: Stuart Douglas

Production company: D Films

Exposure: National TV

Sekonda

Project: Men’s and women’s watches

Client: Julian Pollock, director

Brief: Add credentials to a

value brand

Agency: Mustoe Merriman Herring Levy

Writer: John Merriman

Art director: John Merriman

Photographer: Nick Otley Typographer: Tim Lewis

Exposure: Style and national press

Sainsbury’s

Project: Value campaign

Client: Andrew Ground, head of brand advertising

Brief: Sainsbury’s offers value worth shouting about

Agency: Abbott Mead

Vickers BBDO

Writer: Tom Jenkins

Art director: Stuart Baker

Director: Richard Loncraine

Production company:

James Garrett & Partners

Exposure: National TV

Times Newspapers

Project: The Times

Client: Toby Constantine, marketing director

Brief: Highlight the value of the Times and its breadth of reporting

Agency: Rainey Kelly

Campbell Roalfe Writer: Richard Beesening

Art director: Richard Beesening

Production company: Godman

Exposure: National TV



Topics

Become a member of Campaign from just £46 a quarter

Get the very latest news and insight from Campaign with unrestricted access to campaignlive.co.uk plus get exclusive discounts to Campaign events

Looking for a new job?

Get the latest creative jobs in advertising, media, marketing and digital delivered directly to your inbox each day.

Create an Alert Now

Partner content

Share

1 Job description: Digital marketing executive

Digital marketing executives oversee the online marketing strategy for their organisation. They plan and execute digital (including email) marketing campaigns and design, maintain and supply content for the organisation's website(s).