PRIVATE VIEW

According to a recent Henley Centre survey, the great British public trusts many of the UK’s major brands more than it does the church and the police. Tesco, Boots and M&S have achieved vast increases in the trust afforded them by Mr and Mrs Punter, while it’s only a matter of time before Kellogg’s usurps our friendly GP from top spot on the Trustometer. Central to the success of these brands is a holistic approach to presenting themselves.

According to a recent Henley Centre survey, the great British

public trusts many of the UK’s major brands more than it does the church

and the police. Tesco, Boots and M&S have achieved vast increases in the

trust afforded them by Mr and Mrs Punter, while it’s only a matter of

time before Kellogg’s usurps our friendly GP from top spot on the

Trustometer. Central to the success of these brands is a holistic

approach to presenting themselves.



Like a perfectly forged bell that rings with true pitch wherever it’s

struck, so a well-managed brand delivers to all audiences across all

media with a consistency and integrity.



The late Linda McCartney’s name as a food brand unfortunately fails to

gain a mention as the epitome of trust. In common with Paul Newman’s

sauces and Terrence Stamp’s crisps, the attachment of celebrity status

to a food range feels like an act of cynical commercialism.



With this in mind, I watched the first of the week’s offerings, for

Linda McCartney’s mince-with-no-meat dish. Mince with no meat is no

worse than a commercial with no ideas. I’m unsure as to what expertise

Linda’s name brought to the art of food preparation but of one thing I’m

certain - it’s beautifully photographed.



If you want real integrity, look to children. The most strikingly

original work gracing most agencies’ walls is often the toddlers’

paintings proudly displayed in AdMum or AdDad’s office. So it is with

the Sea Life posters.



Sea Life is for kids, so who better to do your advertising? Such a pity

some grown-ups felt they had to take control of the bottom 10 per cent

of these posters. Naughty, naughty grown-ups.



Loseley is a brand that deserves to be high up on the Trustometer.

Genuinely farm-made, with pure ingredients, Loseley has an

uncompromising integrity about everything it does. If ever a brand

deserved some famous advertising, this is it. If ever there was some

advertising to meet this need, this wasn’t it. I’m reminded that dairy

produce isn’t the only thing farms produce a load of.



Jim Davidson - man of integrity or lucked-out second-rate invader of our

living rooms? While his all-singing, all-punning performance on Big

Break is just about forgivable against the stomach-churning antics of Mr

Virgo, his performance in the 49s campaign is not. Where Harry Enfield’s

Mr Cholmondely-Warner translated well into the still image for Mercury,

Jim just looks a bit of a twat. One poster shows a fan of crisp pounds

20 notes, a scene, I’d imagine, not unfamiliar to our Jim prior to

signing his contract.



The latest Penguin commercials take advantage of Mr Webster’s discovery

that animatronic, cuddly penguins can be both endearing and funny. The

choccie biscuit version is neither as funny nor as cuddly as the pint of

bitter version - a shame as the campaign should be applauded for its

ambition. The premise of penguins picking up ’persons’ is a very good

one. One spot shows two penguins chatting up a nauseatingly smooth 80s

adman on the top deck of a bus. The gag (and I nearly did) ’How far are

you going love?’ ’All the way!’ is ppppathetic.



Finally, the best of an uninspiring bunch. Simple is a brand you can

trust, Rainey Kelly is a company with integrity and together they’ve

made a piece of very distinctive advertising. ’Keep it simple, not

complex’ is the message a spokeswoman espouses to her ’sisters’, who

listen attentively in a rather awkward, nondescript setting. I love the

simplicity.



I love its subversion of the category. The idea of a militant skincare

demonstration is a much bigger idea than a one-off TV ad. Try watching

it with no picture, like I did accidentally. I’ve got a hunch it’s an

even better radio campaign. Trust me.





SMITH & NEPHEW

Consumer Products

Project: Simple Skincare

Client: Shelley Law, marketing controller

Brief: Position Simple as the brand with the simple, honest approach to

effective skincare

Agency: Rainey Kelly Campbell Roalfe

Writer: Robert Campbell

Art director: Mark Roalfe

Director: Stuart Douglas

Production company: D-Films

Exposure: National TV



49s LIMITED

Project: 49s

Client: Claire Potter, marketing director

Brief: Relaunch 49s as a numbers game in betting shops

Agency: Walsh Trott Chick Smith

Writer: Dave Trott

Art director: Gordon Smith

Photographer: Richard Ansett

Typographer: Mark Goodwin

Exposure: National press and betting shop windows

VARDON ATTRACTIONS

Project: Sea Life Centres

Client: Mark Fisher, head of marketing and sales

Brief: Differentiate Sea Life from other aquaria by communicating the

unique emotional appeal for children

Agency: DMB&B

Writer: Steve Whitely

Art director: Paul Reading

Typographer: Ed Church

Exposure: Selected poster sites nationally

McVITIE’S

Project: Penguin

Client: Mark Horgan,

marketing director

Brief: Launch the three-fingered Penguin and show it’s perfect for when

you’re peckish

Agency: Publicis

Writer: Noel Sharman

Art director: Noel Sharman

Director: David Garfath

Production company: The Paul Weiland Film Company

Exposure: National TV

McVITIE’S PREPARED FOODS

Project: Linda McCartney Frozen Foods

Client: James Turton, marketing manager

Brief: Broaden the appeal of the brand by attracting meat reducers

Agency: RPM3

Writer: Tim Johnson

Art director: Tim Johnson

Director: Gus Filgate

Production company: 2am Films

Exposure: National, satellite TV

LOSELEY CHILLED PRODUCTS

Project: Yoghurt range

Client: Tim Henniker-Parker, chairman and managing director

Brief: Promote the brand as the Rolls-Royce of yoghurts

Agency: Gotham

Writer: Eliza Parker

Art director: Bev Fortnum

Photographer: Patrick de Villiers

Exposure: National quality press



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Digital marketing executives oversee the online marketing strategy for their organisation. They plan and execute digital (including email) marketing campaigns and design, maintain and supply content for the organisation's website(s).