PRIVATE VIEW

The hyperactivity by D&AD on behalf of young, would-be admakers should be admired, supported and helped in order to maintain the high creative standards in the UK. Good tuition and guidance will help propel them through the millennium and into the wonderful world of adland. If they’ve had a good guide, they’ll discover the routes to avoid. If they’ve been well schooled, they’ll know the routes to choose.

The hyperactivity by D&AD on behalf of young, would-be admakers

should be admired, supported and helped in order to maintain the high

creative standards in the UK. Good tuition and guidance will help propel

them through the millennium and into the wonderful world of adland. If

they’ve had a good guide, they’ll discover the routes to avoid. If

they’ve been well schooled, they’ll know the routes to choose.



The Classic Malts route is the well-trodden one that normally follows a

factory visit. This is another in a long line of the Gaelic names,

bannocks, braes, mists, peat and, to quote the ad, ’A crystal clear

snow-melt that gathers up a heady mixture of honey sweet mountain

heather ...’ This is top-class MacBullshit and will probably surprise us

all by being consumed in vast quantities this Christmas.



The Camelot work is the equally well-trodden route of worthiness and

altruism but with the slightly tainted whiff of seediness. The seedy bit

is who really gets or should get the handouts. Here we see an attempt to

echo the charm and humour of Brassed Off without quite convincing us of

their needs. Another spot shows an athletic coach in stylised

situations, struggling with her sports speak to convince us of her

commitment to tomorrow’s track stars. The director’s homage to Brassed

Off and the Reebok commercial I see, note and appreciate. Any further

criticism of these two worthies would be churlish.



The TV Licensing ads remind us how difficult it is to catch people

committing crimes in their own homes. Although this brief has produced

awards in the past, time has not made the problem easier. Shame only

becomes valid if other people know. The first spot shows a dreadful old

aristo using his status to fiddle the books. He is shamed into paying

and grudgingly allows the riff-raff into his house to cover further

expenses. Spot number two depicts the equally disgusting face of a pushy

businessman whose son has failed to pay for the TV licence due to

pressure of work. Believe that one. Spot number three introduces us to a

fat, high-rise-living Sun reader with an ambition to become a high-class

minder. His fine for licence evasion thwarts the ambition. Shame.



These convincing rascals should all meet at therapy class to help each

other with their next scam. The director tells their stories well.



The Chicken Tonight spot is from the now fashionable - yet, not so long

ago, to be avoided at all costs - enthusiastic presenter school of

advertising.



All thanks for its resurgence go to Tango, Pot Noodle, Miller and Jack

Dee. But it can be dangerous if you get lost en route. Even Wrighty,

fresh from his One2One success, doesn’t automatically make this piece

amusing. Don’t panic. At least you’ve got Ian doing that chicken

dance.



The Quality Street ad comes from the ’let’s work closely with the

client’ school. His enthusiasm for the product has been so embedded in

the psyche of the planner/account man that your job has been made easy.

The only problem is that the excitement doesn’t travel from the meeting

room to the production floor and on to the screen.



With Volkswagen we have one of the great schools of advertising. Since

the launch of the Beetle in New York in the early 60s, this client has

produced masses of award-winning campaigns. It’s easy to follow in the

footsteps of great ads, I hear you say. Let me tell you it’s not. The

most difficult thing is to follow these footsteps. You can only

fail.



The current campaigns for VW are remarkable in the skills of claiming

product initiatives from right under the noses of the other car makers.

This latest piece, which opens on a Tai-Chi class somewhere in North

London, is compulsive viewing. VW moves on.



All concerned go to the top of the class. All students take note.



Have your say on channel six of CampaignLive at www.campaignlive.com





UDV

Project: The Classic Malts range - Talisker and Dalwhinnie

Client: Tim O’Donnell, marketing controller

Brief: Establish the individual characteristics of each of the six

classic malt whiskies

Agency: WCRS

Writer: Steve Little

Art director: Tim Robertson

Photographer: Kevin Griffin

Typographer: Leonie Brierley

Exposure: National press - review sections and magazines

Van den Bergh Foods

Project: Chicken Tonight

Client: Maria Bullen, senior brand manager

Brief: Drive interest and excitement around a new range of cooking

sauces

Agency: J. Walter Thompson

Writer: Jaspar Shelbourne

Art director: Jaspar Shelbourne

Director: Richard Phillips

Production company: RJ Phillips & Co

Exposure: National TV

BBC

Project: TV Licensing

Client: John Pink, head of licensing, marketing and sales

Brief: Make people think about the consequences of being caught without

a TV licence

Agency: TBWA GGT

Simons Palmer Writer: Michael Burke

Art director: John Anderson

Director: Paul Gay

Production company: Outsider

Exposure: National TV

NESTLE

Project: Quality Street

Client: Jonathan Box, group products manager

Brief: Show what is special about Quality Street

Agency: Ammirati Puris Lintas

Writer: Adam Denton

Art director: Andy Fairless

Production company: The Pink Film Company

Exposure: National terrestrial and satellite TV

VOLKSWAGEN UK

Project: VW Polo

Client: Nigel Brotherton, national communications manager

Brief: Dramatise the safety of the Polo

Agency: BMP DDB

Writer: Andy McLeod

Art director: Richard Flintham

Director: Ringan Ledwidge

Production company: The End

Exposure: National TV

CAMELOT

Project: The National Lottery

Client: Ian Milligan, marketing director

Brief: Re-engage players by illustrating how monies raised can help

build a better Britain

Agency: WCRS Writer: Leon Jaume

Art director: Rooney Carruthers

Director: Elliot Naftalin

Production company: Spectre

Exposure: National TV



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