Private View

My rather profound theory is that this century won’t go as dome-shaped as the last if we all start thinking Australian. In the latest Foster’s commercial, a horror-stricken girl walks into a flat and declares that she’s just seen the ’Four Riders of the Apocalypse’. Her bloke sips his Foster’s and replies: ’Don’t worry darling, it’s not the end of the world.’ It’s a funny addition to an excellent campaign, written by creatives who are clearly revelling in cocking their legs and pissing the amber nectar into Castlemaine XXXX territory.

My rather profound theory is that this century won’t go as

dome-shaped as the last if we all start thinking Australian. In the

latest Foster’s commercial, a horror-stricken girl walks into a flat and

declares that she’s just seen the ’Four Riders of the Apocalypse’. Her

bloke sips his Foster’s and replies: ’Don’t worry darling, it’s not the

end of the world.’ It’s a funny addition to an excellent campaign,

written by creatives who are clearly revelling in cocking their legs and

pissing the amber nectar into Castlemaine XXXX territory.



Creating a desirable label by being anti-label is an interesting ploy

and up to now Muji has pulled it off. However, I am sad to say, it all

gets a little tiresome in its new print campaign. The ads disappear up

their own worthiness, and while it’s smart for Muji that its

communication doesn’t look like advertising, it sure as hell should look

like something.



It’s always good for the soul to see a spot of intelligent wit in

advertising and the new Guinness campaign has it in abundance. It’s a

simple, strong, sharp idea and the wit is bang on for a brand that has

always placed itself slightly above lager in the evolutionary chain.



MAG stands for Mines Advisory Group and in its new commercial we see a

young girl playing hop-scotch in the war-torn remnants of what was once

presumably a green place. The words ’millions of land-mines remain

uncleared’ come up and, from that moment on, unless your heart is made

of sterner stuff than mine, the film is compelling. Will she or won’t

she tread on a mine? What can I do to make sure she doesn’t? I have one

gripe, the film is too arty. Now and again the action freezes and

throughout the cuts are too frequent. Melodramatic editing is not

necessary when you’re dealing with such an emotive idea.



’The New Year starts now’ is the endline on the Capital Radio TV

campaign, which leads me to believe that its sell-by date was the last

day of the previous century.



No matter, it’s still fresh. Shot verite, it features several lunatics

dancing and generally being daft in front of unsuspecting bystanders,

all of whom react with the kind of perplexed fear that only the English

can muster. My favourite is the girl shaking her considerable booty at a

bus stop. Quite clearly the idea wasn’t written by Funkadelic but it

kind of feels like it was. There can be no higher praise.



Now for the serious stuff. A shed load of media money is being spent on

the new Department of Health anti-smoking campaign, which is important

since I suspect the ubiquity of any anti-smoking message is almost as

relevant as the message itself.



In the TV commercials, we see a video diary of people taking us through

their daily experiences as they attempt to give up the deadly weed. Boy,

are they going through hell. They make stopping seem like a Herculean

job, something beyond the will of mere mortals. Now just maybe this will

help people who try and fail to retain enough self-esteem to not throw

in the towel, but surely there’s a danger that it will lead some people

to believe the task is too big to contemplate. If you want to persuade

people to do something difficult, is reminding them just how difficult

it is really the best way to go about it?



The posters, exemplified by ’don’t give up on giving up’, stem from

adland word play rather than any real understanding and, ubiquity and

all, they will be no more influential than ’smoking kills’ on the

packs.



By the by, have you ever seen the inside of an airport smoking room?



Put a hidden camera into any one of them and a 40-second edit would

reveal a collection of grey-faced people, sucking desperately on their

last pre-flight fag, apparently waiting not for a plane but for

death.



On a more cheerful note, I wish each and every one of you a weed free

and therefore healthy New Year.



Guinness

Project: Guinness draught in cans

Client: Jane Sutcliffe,

brand manager

Brief: Transfer the motivation that Guinness drinkers have for the pub

version of the product to the canned version Agency: Abbott Mead Vickers

BBDO Writer: Jeremy Carr Art director: Dave Dye

Photographer: Annabelle Elston

Typographer: Brian McHale

Exposure: National 6-sheet, Liverpool & Sheffield 48-sheet


Mines Advisory Group

Project: Land-mines

Client: Tim Carstairs, director of communications

Brief: Raise awareness of

the continuing threat of land-mines worldwide

Agency: Banks Hoggins O’Shea FCB

Writer: Jason Andrews

Art director: Kevin Macmillan

Director: Charles Hendley

Production company: H30 Films

Exposure: National TV


Scottish Courage

Project: Foster’s lager

Client: John Botia, marketing manager

Brief: Present Foster’s ’no worries’ view of the millennium

Agency: M&C Saatchi

Writer: Jonathan Lander

Art director: Steve Paskin

Director: Ringan Ledwidge

Production company: Harry Nash

Exposure: National TV


Ryohin Keikaku Europe

Project: Muji

Client: Ewan Douglas, operations director

Brief: Create awareness of core Muji brand

Agency: Willox Ambler Rodford Law

Writers: Helen Williams, Alan Rodford

Art director: Helen Williams

Typographer: Helen Williams Photographer: Jonathan Knowles

Exposure: National press


Department of Health

Project: Tobacco education Client: Penny Dolby, chief publicity officer

Brief: Encourage 70 per cent of smokers who want to give up to keep

trying

Agency: Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO Writers: Tony Strong, Tim Riley

Art directors: Mike Durban, Rob Oliver, Dave Dye

Directors: Tom Carty, Barnie Cokeliss

Production companies: Godman, Concrete Photographer: Jenny Van Sommers

Typographer: Alex Talikowski

Exposure: National and satellite TV, posters


Capital Radio

Project: Capital Radio

Client: Vijay Solanki, marketing director

Brief: Start celebrating the millennium early

Agency: AMV BBDO

Writer: David Sullivan Art director: Tom Ewart

Director:John O’Driscoll Production company: Paul Weiland Film Company

Exposure: London TV



Nick Hastings is the executive creative director of D’Arcy.



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