PRIVATE VIEW

’Do something you enjoy, and get someone to pay you for it,’ was one of the late, great Terence Donovan lines. I’ve been lucky to have followed his advice and get away with it, despite the fact that it does feel like hard work sometimes. I wonder how many clients have considered whether their agencies’ creatives enjoy working on their business or not.

’Do something you enjoy, and get someone to pay you for it,’ was

one of the late, great Terence Donovan lines. I’ve been lucky to have

followed his advice and get away with it, despite the fact that it does

feel like hard work sometimes. I wonder how many clients have considered

whether their agencies’ creatives enjoy working on their business or

not.



It was one of the best clients I ever worked for - David Lamb of Nestle

- who, after trashing a raft of KitKat scripts, couldn’t think of

anything else to chide us with as we left and blurted out ’you enjoyed

doing those’.



I believe the more creatives enjoy working for a client the more

effective the work will be. I don’t believe that means clients agreeing

to all our ideas, but I’m certain it shows in the work. The TV I’ve been

looking at here has enjoyment in nearly every ad, although I fear the

most enjoyment in Blockbusters was had by the creative team on the

shoot. We cut from one trendy location to another, from one hip ethnic

stereotype to another as they carry their radioactive video home for the

night. Every corporate box ticked and no-one touched by the pleasure of

a great movie at home.



The version I was given had a bland worldwide voiceover on it, whereas

the one I’ve seen running on television has Ian MacShane and a much

better brief in the voiceover, which offers your choice of video free if

they don’t have it in stock.



The brief for Ikea, however, must have been a nightmare. ’Tell them, if

we had more assistants everything would cost more. Tell them

self-assembly isn’t so bad. Tell them waiting 15 minutes instore isn’t

the end of the world, they’d still have to wait 12 days for

delivery’



Everyone that worked on these ads enjoyed themselves so much that if it

was athletics they’d all be tested for drugs. The tattooed Indian is

wise, wonderful and very memorable. Although the tattoos look a tad like

ballpoint doodles, he convinces everyone that the way of Ikea is the way

it’s always been. I enjoyed them but my wife wants to know what they’ve

got to do with the price of fish or self-assembly tables.



More fun with Jammie Dodgers and a straightforward proposition: ’How

jammy can you get?’ I prefer the charm of the bank robber who has just

robbed ’Mead’s Bank’ and jumps into the police car - the glass slipper

is too pantomime for me. The opportunity is there to build an effective

brand property. Unfortunately, too few clients stick with anything long

enough to get it into the hearts and minds of the punters.



The Renault Scenic also has a good idea - After Eight meets Notting Hill

with gossip about Nick and Emma’s move to India. I think this kind of

dialogue is hard to get away with, especially outside Soho, and would

Nick and Emma really take their Renault Scenic with them? It doesn’t

have the sharpness or believability of that great Audi ad that had the

yuppie prat on a test drive.



The only ad I didn’t enjoy was the BP robot with Visco lubricants

running through her veins giving her life. Obviously there was a point

to it but I couldn’t be bothered to get it and neither the computer

graphics nor the music lifted it above average and made it relevant to

my car or me.



Clarks, however, was total enjoyment. A client who enjoys their product,

agency planners who enjoyed finding a brief with a truth about new

shoes, and creatives and production company who found different ways of

showing a great cast enjoying their new shoes. I love the girl in the

ladies jumping up on the toilet seat to see her shoes in the mirror and

the guy in the park lifting his foot over a stray football coming his

way.



Even the pack shot was wonderfully stylish with a great voiceover that

simply asked ’New shoes?’ and moaned with pleasure.



At the moment, my moans of enjoyment are thanks to a client who

suggested we shoot a commercial with Sir Alex Ferguson, and we did. Now

that’s what I call doing something you enjoy.



Blockbuster Entertainment

Project: Blockbuster

Client: Vernon Salt, senior vice-president, worldwide advertising and

international marketing

Brief: Develop a global campaign for Blockbuster that owns the position

of ’transforming an ordinary evening into a great night in’

Agency: Doner Cardwell Hawkins

Writer: Chris Kirk

Art director: Ivan Davies

Director: Rob Sanders

Production company: HLA

Exposure: Worldwide TV


Clarks

Project: Clarks

Client: Hugh Croad, marketing communications manager

Brief: Link Clarks with the pleasure of owning new shoes

Agency: St Luke’s

Writer: Ruth Jackson

Art director: Nick Simons

Director: Paul Gay

Production company: Outsider

Exposure: National TV


Renault

Project: Renault Scenic

Client: Jonathan Wignall, manager, advertising and promotions

Brief: Renault Scenic - a fresh start everyday

Agency: Publicis

Writer: Noel Sharman

Art director: Stephen Glenn

Director: Jeff Stark

Production company: Stark Films

Exposure: National TV


BP Lubricants Europe

Project: BP Lubricants

Client: Spyros Michalakakis, European marketing manager

Brief: Relaunch BP Lubricants in Europe

Agency: Doner Cardwell Hawkins

Writer: Damian Simor

Art director: Lee Ford

Director: Paul Street

Production company: Streetlight

Exposure: Pan-European TV


Burton’s

Project: Mini Jammie Dodgers and Jammie Dodger Dipz

Client: Iain Paton, marketing director

Brief: They’re just so jammy

Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi

Creative team: Dave Askwith, Andrew Fisher

Director: James Howarth

Production company: Mustard

Exposure: Cinema and national TV


Ikea

Project: Ikea

Client: Frances Evans, advertising manager

Brief: Defend Ikea’s policy of self-service, self-assembly and

self-transportation

Agency: St Luke’s

Writer: Alan Young

Art director: Julian Vizard

Director: Rocky Morton

Production company: Partizan Midi Minuit

Exposure: National TV