PRIVATE VIEW

All of the ads here are good. That said, each is good in a different way.

All of the ads here are good. That said, each is good in a

different way.



Let's start with Red. With a name like that, the first thing you'd

probably think of doing is to shoot everything in red, which the team

has duly done. Then you'd try to depict the typical reader as

good-looking and independent. Which the team has duly done. Girl gets

home, but rather than go out with boyfriend opts to stay in to read Red.

There's lashings of 'attitude' here, I'm told, which many

thirtysomething women will identify with. So that's good.



Good, also, is the HSBC campaign in as much as it tells us the old

listening bank now talks money. There is a taut, no-nonsense tone and

style to the ads, which could be the start of turning a big name into a

brand. And, of course, the logo at the end is a whopper. So that's good

too.



The Weight Watchers film looks like someone's made a limited production

budget stretch a long way. Each vignette is colourised a different hue,

so the whole feels like a slow move through a rainbow. The team has

tried hard to make an ad that'll stand out in a break. So that's

good.



Audi. Two executives walk through an airport car park. Pompous one in

grey says: 'My father told me, Justin, don't trust the men in grey.

Ciao.' Then he can't find his car among all the Rover-like clones.

Matey, though, heads straight to his silver Audi A6. Bartle Bogle

Hegarty is finding more mileage in its brilliant 'don't be a prat'

campaign, and that's good.



Magic FM has a baby hand-jiving and chickens making music. If they don't

make you smile, you need that ulcer treated urgently. They're lots of

fun, and that's good.



In the Yellow Pages commercial, young dude gets back to his flat to be

met by worried neighbour. The gaff's been trashed, she tells him, tears

of pity in her eyes. But he hasn't been burgled. He just hasn't tidied

the place in years. Guiltily, he reaches for Yellow Pages. 'Spotless

cleaners ? I could do with some help.' She reappears, close to retching.

'You won't believe what they've done to your bathroom.'



I love it. It's a beautifully written and beautifully shot testament to

the craft skills of those who made it. Good, definitely. Maybe not Gold

good, but a Silver somewhere isn't out of the question. In fact, it's

the only film of the six that stands a chance of a prize.



Looked at through the eyes of a D&AD juror, I'm afraid all the others

look a little threadbare - even the Audi ad, which has clearly been shot

for Euroland. It's neat, it's competent, it's running in Portugal. As a

consequence, it has none of the class-conscious satire of 'yuppie' or

'golf club'.



Yes, good is when you are startlingly original and establish new

boundaries for advertising. You win awards and become famous. But good

is also helping sell a lot of product. Good is helping your client's

career as well as your own. Good is taking a thousand-word brief and

reducing it to one coherent thought. It's doing it cheaply as well as

effectively. It's continuing a campaign rather than reinventing the

wheel. It's pushing the nut forward.



It's finding a specific solution to a specific problem.



What's bad? Wasting money is bad. Being irrelevant is bad. Telling lies

is bad. None of the films I've been asked to review does any of that.

And that's good.



Now, sad news. Mairi Clark leaves Campaign this week. For the past three

years, she has edited Private View. She's encouraged wit and zest from

her contributors but never let any of us get mad or get even. This page

will miss her.



Have your say on channel six of CampaignLive at www.campaignlive.com





AUDI

Project: Audi brand campaign

Client: Sally Mawson, marketing communications manager

Brief: Use driver imagery to express Audi's progressive attitude

Agency: Bartle Bogle Hegarty

Writers: Jeremy Carr, Rob Jack

Art director: Tony McTear

Director: Mike Stephenson

Production company: The Paul Weiland Film Company

Exposure: National TV

EMAP RADIO

Project: Magic FM

Client: Brendan Moffett, brand director

Brief: Rebrand Melody as Magic and show that music gives you a feeling

nothing else can

Agency: Mother

Director: Chris Palmer

Production company: Gorgeous

Exposure: National TV

EMAP ELAN

Project: Red magazine

Client: Kerry Tasker, marketing director

Brief: Sum up that Red is grown up but still great fun and a real treat

to read

Agency: Rainey Kelly Campbell Roalfe

Writer: Phil Cockrell

Art director: Graham Storey

Director: Andy Morahan

Production company: The Paul Weiland Film Company

Exposure: National TV

YELLOW PAGES

Project: Yellow Pages

Client: Nigel Marson, head of marketing communications

Brief: Promote usage of the directory

Agency: Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO

Writer: Mary Wear

Art director: Damon Collins

Director: Tom Vaughan

Production company: Helen Langridge Associates

Exposure: National TV

HEINZ

Project: Weight Watchers

Client: Rachel Moffatt, category manager, frozen ready meals

Brief: Reposition the range away from the idea of diet food, targeting

women who are proactively looking to eat a healthy balanced diet

Agency: Bates Dorland

Writer: Jon Canning

Art director: Jon Canning

Director: Patricia Murphy

Production company: Patricia Murphy Films

Exposure: National TV

HSBC

Project: Midland Bank

rebranding

Client: Alan Hughes, general manager, marketing

Brief: Urge people to take control of their finances

Agency: St Luke's

Writer: Jason Gormley

Art director: Steve McKenzie

Director: Trevor Melvin

Production company: Blink

Exposure: National &

satellite TV





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