Rainey Kelly Simple ad emphasises ’honesty’

Simple skincare returns to television next week, after an absence of three years, with a pounds 1.5 million national advertising campaign by Rainey Kelly Campbell Roalfe.

Simple skincare returns to television next week, after an absence

of three years, with a pounds 1.5 million national advertising campaign

by Rainey Kelly Campbell Roalfe.



Rainey Kelly has jettisoned the famous line, ’Not perfumed. Not

coloured.



Just kind’, in favour of a new positioning which rejects the confusing

technical claims of many skincare ads for a realistic approach.



The message of the new campaign is ’skincare is Simple’. The TV ad is

set in what appears to be a covered amphitheatre, in which a group of

young women relax in comfort and listen to a talk about skincare. They

are told: ’Skincare isn’t just about amazing miracle formulas. It’s not

about expensive packaging - eternal youth does not come in pots. Just

eat well, sleep well, protect yourself from the sun.’



Shelley Law, the marketing controller for Simple skincare, said: ’The

campaign is launched at a time when Simple is buoyant and we intend to

bolster this growth. Simple delivers everything you need for a good

skincare routine. Unlike our competitors, we don’t need to blind the

consumer with science.’



The campaign was written by Robert Campbell and art directed by Mark

Roalfe, the creative partners of Rainey Kelly, and was directed by

Stuart Douglas through D Films.



Rainey Kelly was awarded the Simple brand more than a year ago by its

owner, Smith & Nephew, which also owns Lil-lets, another of the agency’s

clients.



Judy Mitchem, the account director on the Simple business at Rainey

Kelly, said: ’At last a manufacturer has been brave enough to confirm

what we all secretly know - that good skincare is not rocket science,

it’s about maintaining a sound, fundamental skincare routine with good

quality products and a healthy lifestyle.’



The campaign will run on ITV, Channel 4, Channel 5, S4C and satellite

stations for four weeks from 1 April.



Simple caused controversy when it abandoned creative agencies in April

1995 and ploughed its ad budget into infomercials, created with the aid

of its media shop, the then Pattison Horswell Durden.



The three-minute films were based around make-overs, as popularised in

women’s magazines. They were billed as TV programmes in listings for

satellite channels, and ran twice a day for six months. A print

advertorial campaign ran concurrently.



The last burst of Simple’s advertising using the ’Not perfumed. Not

coloured ...’ line ran four years ago. The campaign was created by

Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO.