REPORT ON WORLDWIDE ADVERTISING: Small world - London 2000 is the time and place to debate the changing global market, Adrian Vickers says

Having recently taken on the role of president of the International Advertising Association UK Chapter, I find my perspective broadening on the changing influences in the international scene which this Campaign report addresses.

Having recently taken on the role of president of the International

Advertising Association UK Chapter, I find my perspective broadening on

the changing influences in the international scene which this Campaign

report addresses.



It is fascinating, for example, that in today’s market, a tiny two- or

three-person agency can run a global campaign from a token office.



The increasing use of new media has shrunk the world as we know it,

removing the old boundaries and constraints, especially if satellites

and the internet are part of the whole marketing mix.



However, it is the big marketing players who are having a profound

effect on the way the advertising industry - particularly its agencies -

is having to gear up to meet these new needs. Shorter lines of

communication, policy decisions being made at higher levels and control

of budgets being managed centrally are all allowing greater senior

client involvement in advertising strategy and execution.



Advertising agencies are merging too, so that there are fewer and bigger

multinational agencies seeking to serve all aspects of their clients’

communication needs. The rise and rise of ’integration’ reflects the

flowering of developments that have evolved over the last 30 years but

now have a greater chance of succeeding with the increased use of

IT.



It may well be that these new agency structures will employ fewer people

in the future, and that the skill levels of individuals will be

higher.



Whether the majority of agency employees will eventually become

’generalists’, capable of operating across the whole range of marketing

communications disciplines and media, remains to be seen. It seems

certain, however, that agencies which provide inadequate training will

find it increasingly difficult to prosper.



The ambition of rising stars may not be to run one office of a global

empire, but to run an international account with 200 or 300 executives

reporting to them from around the world.



The development of international commercial communication in the near

future will be the subject of the 37th IAA World Advertising Congress in

London next June. Between 2,000 and 2,500 delegates are expected from

all over the world. The conference theme will be: ’Beyond the Cutting

Edge: the Communications Blueprint for the New Millennium.’



The congress aims to confirm London as the centre of excellence for

advertising and marketing skills which contribute substantially to the

commercial success of international businesses based in Britain and

elsewhere.



It will also demonstrate the contribution that information technology

will make during the next decade and beyond. And it will aim to enhance

the IAA’s reputation as the international organisation that works with

other major bodies in the defence of freedom to advertise and freedom of

commercial speech.



There are still barriers that exist around the world on every level,

from national boundaries and different laws and trading practices to

creative and cultural distinctions. Worldwide experts will comment on

these in depth.



This congress will be truly global - chaired by Sir Dominic Cadbury,

chairman of Cadbury Schweppes - with speakers drawn from all over the

world.



The title of the congress is ’London 2000’. It is hard to imagine a more

appropriate location and year in which to reveal and debate a vision of

how the advertising industry should prepare for a future which will

differ radically from its past.



Adrian Vickers is deputy chairman of



Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO and president of the IAA (UK Chapter).



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