REVIEW: Marketing and advertising news in the week’s press

Forte Hotels has shortlisted Publicis, WCRS and Rainey Kelly Campbell Roalfe to pitch for its pounds 10 million advertising campaign. The brief will centre around its core brands, Le Meridien, Heritage and Posthouse, and is expected to include TV advertising. The chain is also thought to be considering centralising its advertising into a single shop. - Marketing Week

Forte Hotels has shortlisted Publicis, WCRS and Rainey Kelly

Campbell Roalfe to pitch for its pounds 10 million advertising campaign.

The brief will centre around its core brands, Le Meridien, Heritage and

Posthouse, and is expected to include TV advertising. The chain is also

thought to be considering centralising its advertising into a single

shop. - Marketing Week



Chris Townsend (left) is leaving the home shopping service, British

Interactive Broadcasting, to return to BSkyB as marketing director for

digital services. Townsend has been brought back to the company by Mark

Booth, BSkyB’s chief executive, in a bid to ensure the broadcaster will

launch its digital system by its proposed June launch date. - Marketing

Week



The Marketing Store, the UK’s largest independent sales promotion

company, has merged with Chicago-based MB Sales to form the Marketing

Store Worldwide. The new company will have 15 offices in eight countries

and will have a combined turnover of pounds 160 million. The deal was

prompted by the Marketing Store’s desire to have more European influence

over McDonald’s, its biggest global client. - General release



Procter & Gamble has beaten its rival, Lever Brothers, to be the first

company to launch a laundry detergent in tablet form. Trials for Ariel

tablets will run in supermarkets in the Grimsby area from this month.

Lever is thought to be planning a similar launch later this year. -

Marketing



Virgin Vie, the cosmetics chain which launched last October, has

appointed Circus to handle its communications and in-store promotions.

The chain used a virtual agency centred on Quiet Storm and Manning

Gottlieb Media to create its launch cinema campaign. - General

release



Mitchell Patterson Grime Mitchell has won the brief to take the

specialist tea maker, Twinings, back on to television after a four-year

absence. The agency won the account after a competitive pitch involving

Leagas Delaney, RPM3 and Maher Bird. The incumbent, Saatchi & Saatchi,

did not pitch because it resigned the account in November last year to

take on the Premier Beverages account. - General release



True North Communications has posted losses of dollars 50 million for

1997, compared with a profit of dollars 37.9 million for 1996. The

losses are attributed to the foiled take-over attempt by Publicis at the

tail-end of the year and the merger with Bozell Jacobs Kenyon &

Eckhardt. Revenues for the year went up from dollars 987 million to

dollars 1.2 billion. - Financial Times



McCann-Erickson Scotland has poached David Maclaine (right) from

Glasgow-based Adpartners to take up the post of managing director.

Maclaine was managing director at Adpartners and is McCann’s first

appointment since its proposed merger with the Leith Agency fell through

at the end of last year. He replaces Aubrey Malden, who left the agency

last year. - General release



British Digital Broadcasting has chosen Grundig, Pace, Philips, Nokia,

Sony and Toshiba to make its set-top boxes for the launch of its digital

terrestrial broadcasting service later this year. The boxes will be

distributed to shops in time for the peak Christmas season. - General

release



The mobile phone network, Orange, is investing pounds 1 million to

establish itself as the title sponsor of the 1998 British Academy Film

Awards. This year’s awards mark the 50th anniversary of Bafta and also

the first time the film awards have been split from the TV awards.

Orange is expected to run film-themed promotions around the sponsorship.

- General release



The proposed merger between the Dutch company, Wolters Kluwer, and Reed

Elsevier, has been abandoned following fears of objections from European

regulators. The merger was called off after the European Commission made

it clear that the companies would probably have to sell a large number

of their specialist publishing operations. - Financial Times.