RKCR and Lowe chiefs take Apprentices to the cleaners

Last night, BBC One's 'The Apprentice' called on ad execs RKCR/Y&R chief executive Richard Exon, DLKW Lowe's creative director Tom Hudson, and managing partner strategy Rebecca Morgan, as candidates took part in an ad task.

Richard Exon: unimpressed with The Apprentice candidates' efforts
Richard Exon: unimpressed with The Apprentice candidates' efforts

The groups’ task was to create and produce a new brand of household cleaning product, along with a TV and radio ad. The programme's supremo, Lord Alan Sugar, enlisted the help of "one of the top ad agencies" Lowe to use its facilities.

The two teams created the Germ-O-Nater and the Octo-Kleen, which was described by Hudson as an "absolute travesty". The less-than-impressed Morgan described one of the ads as a "good idea struggling to get out, but unfortunately didn’t make it."

Sean Gogarty, Unilever’s head global brand development, also joined the expert panel, but described one of the ads as "quite distasteful".

Exon, who joined the 'The Apprentice: You're Fired' show, called the losing Germ-O-Nater’s campaign as "something no one in their right mind would have in their kitchen and let their kids anywhere near."

The product featured a black and red bottle with a black outline of a child, who instead looked like a woman, along with a TV ad of a father and son trying to remove tough stains from the kitchen.

Exon said the problem with Germ-O-Nater was that "it fell down around casting, advertising, product and branding."

Subscribe to Campaign from just £57 per quarter

Includes the weekly magazine and quarterly Campaign IQ, plus unrestricted online access.

SUBSCRIBE

Looking for a new job?

Get the latest creative jobs in advertising, media, marketing and digital delivered directly to your inbox each day.

Create an Alert Now
Share

1 Meet the new breed of ad agency chiefs

A new wave of first-time CEOs are opting to do things differently in an evolving landscape. They discuss the business model of the future with Jeremy Lee.

Case study: How 'This girl can' got 1.6 million women exercising
Shares0
Share

1 Case study: How 'This girl can' got 1.6 million women exercising

"This girl can" was based on a powerful insight: that the fear of judgement by others is the primary barrier holding women back from participating in sport.

Just published

More