Save the Children appoints SapientNitro for digital transformation

Save The Children has hired SapientNitro for a major digital transformation project.

Save the Children: 'if London were Syria' by Don’t Panic and UNIT9 London
Save the Children: 'if London were Syria' by Don’t Panic and UNIT9 London

The agency has been asked to overhaul the charity’s use of digital platforms across the organisation. It will develop a long-term digital strategy to re-envision the way supporters engage with the charity.

Part of the brief is to identify and recommend a suitable global technology platform for the charity.

There is no incumbent on the account. SapientNitro won the business following a competitive pitch against DigitasLBi, Havas and Blue State Digital. The pitch process kicked off at the end of August.

Sue Allchurch, the director of marketing and communications at Save the Children, said: "SapientNitro demonstrated its ability to define and deliver great supporter experience together with a strong understanding of marketing communications, technology and business change."

The charity has released a range of online content this year, including its 90-second "if London were Syria" film, which won a Gold Cyber Lion in Cannes.

The film by Don’t Panic and UNIT9 London was produced in the style of the "second a day" online films.

It shows how quickly a British girl’s life unravels when an imaginary war comes to London.

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