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Small businesses struggle to promote employees' mental well being

One in six businesses don't place importance on employees' work-life balance - and small companies lag behind bigger employers on employees' mental well being

Small businesses struggle to promote employees' mental well being

If you want a less stressful job, you're better off looking at bigger organisations, according to the results of a new YouGov Business Omnibus survey.

The research found that there is a clear difference in approach to how employers promote mental well being, based on the size of the organisation involved. Small businesses (44 per cent) surveyed are far more likely to admit they don’t do anything, compared to medium (29 per cent) and large (15 per cent) businesses.

Given the extra resources at their disposal, it is perhaps not surprising that large business are far better than small businesses when it comes to offering employees counselling (44 per cent do so vs. 5 per cent in small businesses), flexible working options (50 per cent vs. 34 per cent) and stress management courses (21 per cent vs. 3 per cent).

Work-life balance

The YouGov research also reveals that a sixth (17 per cent) of British business decision makers think making sure employees maintain a healthy work-life balance is not important to their company.

The research found that 15 per cent of organisations in the UK don’t place any focus on the mental health and wellbeing of employees. Three in ten (31 per cent) say that their company does not do anything to actively promote mental wellbeing in the workplace.

Many employers see benefits in taking action to manage workplace stress. Over six in ten (61 per cent) believe it boosts staff morale and reduces absenteeism, and over half (53 per cent) say it increases efficiency.

Although there's a clear recognition that measures to improve work-life balance and mental well-being can be beneficial, it seems that many businesses are facing challenges in implementing them.

To find out more about how to effectively conduct B2B research, click here

Photo by Maria Eklind licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

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