Sony ads showcase technology surveilling James Bond

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Sony is launching a global product ad campaign showing James Bond under surveillance by a mystery woman using Sony technology such as its Xperia T smartphone.

The ‘Intelligence Gathered’ campaign featuring the fictional M16 character breaks on Friday (26 October), the same day the new James Bond film 'Skyfall' is released.

Creative by Wieden & Kennedy Portland shows James Bond infiltrating a heavily guarded compound, while dispatching adversaries as he advances towards the control room.

Bond's movements are followed by a mystery woman who is watching his progress on Sony Bravia screens, Vaio laptops, Xperia tablets and the Xperia T smartphone.

The ad is designed to drive home the "seamless communication capabilities" of the range of Sony devices.

Sony's television spot, which will include 60-second and 30-second versions, ends with 007 walking into the control room and asking the mystery woman enigmatically, "Looking for someone?".

Television spots will be supported by cinema, print and digital activity, with the latter running on platforms including Sony websites, Facebook and Twitter.

The production company for the campaign was RSA Films and it was directed by Baillie Walsh.

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