Times and Metro run altered Harvey Nichols ad amid complaints

Harvey Nichols' controversial press campaign featuring models who have wet themselves has been run in the Metro and The Times without the offending wet patch.

Harvey Nichols: spring 2012 campaign
Harvey Nichols: spring 2012 campaign

The controversy around the ad has also resulted in around 20 complaints being logged with the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA).

The tongue-in-cheek campaign by DDB UK features four different executions of models who have wet themselves. Each model poses in items from the retailer's Spring Summer 2012 collections.

Text in the creative stated, "The Harvey Nichols Sale. Try to contain your excitement".

Creative run in The Metro and The Times this week includes the tagline but does not show the wet patches.

The Times did not crop the ad itself but requested a different version to be sent, while the Metro was unavailable for comment.

Speaking about the controversial campaign, Harvey Nichols group press and marketing director Julia Bowe said: "In humorous reaction to the often-irrational excitement sale time engenders, we have developed this campaign to capture this near-fanatical spirit."

Follow Matthew Chapman at @mattchapmanUK

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