Twitter still has much to offer and advertisers shouldn't overlook it
A view from Andy Pringle

Twitter still has much to offer and advertisers shouldn't overlook it

Andy Pringle, head of performance media at Performics UK, says Twitter can be the glue to draw together different elements of a wider media plan....

Twitter’s latest results would indicate it's safely afloat, albeit on widely documented reports of choppy seas and brewing storm clouds.

Conversely, Facebook’s Q2 earnings are once again boldly presented, confident and showing growth in a number of key areas. Most fascinating is the company’s success in a number of diversified products and projects, future proofing the company for the years and decades ahead.

Winds of change however, have often blown Twitter around, from internal leadership to its emerging relationship with Google/DoubleClick and in turn, takeover rumours and debate.

Equally, platform updates often lead to stories of user outcry and, somewhat accusatory reports, of them trying to chase Facebook or mirror Snapchat. But as Twitter continues seemingly unabated, so should advertisers and their agencies.

To deliver results and to get cut through, the unique nature of the platform means brands need to think specifically about the space and consider how they qualify success.

A suggestion would be to first look beyond, linear cost-per-click/cost-per-view results or cost-per-thousands when compared to Facebook or Snapchat. When we think of Twitter in a broader, less social, more mobile display context it gives a much fresher, positive outlook.

Equally, success doesn't involve taking any massive risks. It might be something as simple as custom made mobile creative, delivered to a highly targeted audience (an opportunity afforded to us here, better than most others).

However it’s when strategic planning and insight teams are involved early, where Twitter can really come into its own. It's rare to find for example a platform that can better be used as a glue to draw together the different elements of a wider media plan.

Success doesn't involve taking any massive risks. It might be something as simple as custom made mobile creative, delivered to a highly targeted audience (an opportunity afforded to us here, better than most others).

For example the impact of a campaign encompassing sponsorship, outdoor and TV can all be aggregated, analysed and crucially supported and enhanced through the single lens of Twitter.

Similarly, Twitter’s fledgling relationship with Google will soon bear fruits from a wider measurement and attribution perspective. Google is better credited for its role in traditional brand and direct response display and mobile display campaigns.

And finally, Twitter’s relationship with TV and live streaming will be fascinating to watch, especially with the backdrop of Facebook Live, as both parties work out their exact offering in this space, for users and brands alike.

The business has its challenges, and perhaps it’s not for every brand or campaign, but Twitter, a forward thinking, live, mobile video platform, with a huge daily active audience is a place where we find less brands.

It’s certainly a platform that advertisers should consider, as with the right activity, next quarter it will improve both their results, as well as Twitter’s.