Unilever and Tesco resolve pricing spat

Unilever and Tesco have come to an agreement over product pricing, with brands such as Marmite returning to the retailer's shelves.

Unilever: brands like Ben & Jerry's pulled from Tesco's shelves
Unilever: brands like Ben & Jerry's pulled from Tesco's shelves

 Both parties confirmed that the row had been "resolved".

Tesco, it emerged on Wednesday, had pulled Unilever products from its online store after the FMCG giant attempted to boost prices by 10%, according to reports.

That saw brands such as Ben & Jerry's and Dove unavailable through Tesco's website, and running out on physical shelves.

A spokesman for Unilever told the The Guardian: "We have been working together closely to reach this resolution and ensure our much-loved brands are once again fully available. For all those that missed us, thanks for all the love."

While de-listings are common, the move this time was apparently Brexit-related.

Unilever claims a price rise was in order because most of its products are manufactured overseas, meaning it needed to offset the decline in sterling after the UK's vote to leave the European Union on 23 June.

Tesco and the other three major retailers Asda, Morrisons and Sainsbury's were reportedly given little notice of the price rise, however.

Analysts suggested that more suppliers were negotiating price rises privately and that consumers should be prepared to see prices go up.

A Tesco spokesman added: "We always put our customers first and we are pleased this has been resolved to our satisfaction."

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