Virgin Atlantic: Private View Print - Gerry Moira

In these media-neutral days, it's most unfashionable to be labelled as just a television brand or a press brand. Yet few advertisers can demonstrate equal ease and success in both media. Furthermore, you might think that Virgin's status as "official carrier to the tanned and famous" would be better supported among the "shellebridee" glamour of the small screen. But, in fact, most of the spade work was done, and not a few triumphs achieved, in press and outdoor. The consistently high standard of the non-TV work is perhaps all the more remarkable given that it is essentially retail advertising.

Contrary to popular belief, creative departments rather enjoy doing this fast-turnaround tactical stuff. It's the advertising equivalent of that field gun assembly race they used to do at the Royal Tournament. Everyone pulls together, everyone tries to pull the creative secretary, who's had to stand up her boyfriend to work late, the adrenaline flows like lager and everyone gets to eat free pizza in the office while the Mac boys fashion your witty epithets into hard-hitting headlines for tomorrow's press.

Next morning, there's your ad. No time for client fiddling or second thoughts, you're in the papers in black and white. Or, in Virgin's case, red.

Of course, there's a tendency for the process to become more important than the end product but Virgin's efforts stand the test of time. Ironically, the one test they weren't designed for. True, "zip down to Washington" (a below-the-belt reference to the Lewinsky affair) and "Washington. Without a hitch" (a searing indictment of the Bush brothers' electoral shenanigans in Florida) will probably fail to dislodge Gore Vidal as our first recourse for witty commentary on the goings-on in the White House but consider most airlines' dismal lack of imagination in this area. Virgin and Rainey Kelly Campbell Roalfe are at their campaigning best in their spiking of a British Airways' cheap ticket deal with Sainsburys. The copy is tough and competitive without becoming shrill. Strangely, the brand and its agency seem less poised when they have time to think. I've always liked the "But I'm Richard's brother" ad but the poor old dear in the Upper Class Suite ad is just baffling. I mean, I know it's a knob gag, but why?

Virgin's posters tend to fall into two distinct camps: the copy-driven and the design-led. Whereas the latter group was usually used to announce new routes, the former was more likely to promote product superiority, as in "BA don't give a shiatsu" and " Sit, shower and shave". This blend of the factual and the faecal typifies the combative and irreverent side of Virgin but it's in the destination work that the airline comes closest to developing a look of its own. Here, too, the keen student of this traditionally tedious advertising category can detect two schools at work. The Figurative Faction features such charming executions as the Bollywood Dumbo for Delhi and the lost heart for San Francisco (natch). The Graphic Tendency, on the other hand, has given us cheetahs/Jo'burg, Hokusai/Tokyo and the sublime Rastaman/Caribbean. These last three especially hint at a consistent visual homogeneity to rival the Oranges and Apples of this world.

Airlines are perhaps unique in having their own shop window in the form of the Cromwell Road and Virgin has been something of a pioneer in the area of special builds along this unlovely part of London. Executions that stood out (literally) were the terracotta army and the cheeky wobbly jellies 18th birthday builds. In all their advertising endeavours, no-one can accuse Virgin of not having a go ... in either sense.

- Gerry Moira will work for free tickets.

RASTAMAN

Art director: Martha Riley

Typographers: John Tisdall, Ryan Shellard

Exposure: 48-sheet posters, national press

ZIP DOWN TO WASHINGTON

Creative directors: Mark Roalfe, Robert Campbell

Typographer: Ryan Shellard

Exposure: National press

WAVE

Creative directors: Mark Roalfe, Robert Campbell

Typographer: John Tisdall

Exposure: 48- and 96-sheet posters

ELEPHANT

Writer: Richard Beesening

Art director: Martha Riley

Photographer: Mike Parsons

Typographer: Ryan Shellard

Exposure: 48- and 96-sheet posters

CHEETAHS

Creative directors: Mark Roalfe, Robert Campbell

Typographer: John Tisdall

Exposure: 48- and 96-sheet posters

BA'S TOKEN OFFER

Writer: Robert Campbell

Art director: Mark Roalfe

Typographer: John Tisdall

Exposure: National press

SIT, SHOWER, SHAVE

Writer: Cameron Short

Art director: Ben Short

Typographer: John Tisdall

Exposure: 48- and 96-sheet posters, national press

SHIATSU

Art director: Martha Riley

Typographer: Ryan Shellard

Exposure: 48- and 96-sheet posters, national press

TERRACOTTA ARMY

Writer: Phil Cockrell

Art director: Graham Storey

Typographer: John Tisdall

Exposure: Special-build poster, 48- and 96-sheet posters

HEART

Writer: Phil Cockrell

Art director: Graham Storey

Photographer: Dave Stewart

Typographer: John Tisdall

Exposure: 48- and 96-sheet posters

WASHINGTON WITHOUT A HITCH

Writer: Rick Brim

Art director: Greg Mitchell

Typographer: John Tisdall

Exposure: National press

JELLIES

Writer: Graham Cook

Art director: Stuart Elkins

Typographer: Ryan Shellard

Exposure: Special-build poster

I DON'T FLY VIRGIN

Writer: Brian Cooper

Art director: Jason Stewart

Photographer: Dave Stewart

Typographer: Nils Leonard

Exposure: National press

RICHARD'S BROTHER

Writer: Brian Cooper

Art director: Jason Stewart

Photographer: Dave Stewart

Typographer: Nils Leonard

Exposure: National press, 48-sheet poster

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1 Job description: Digital marketing executive

Digital marketing executives oversee the online marketing strategy for their organisation. They plan and execute digital (including email) marketing campaigns and design, maintain and supply content for the organisation's website(s).