Warner Bros tackles piracy with 'great movie moments'

Warner Bros Pictures has teamed up with the Industry Trust for IP Awareness to promote "the value of great movie moments" in an attempt to counter film piracy.

A trailer for 'Happy Feet 2' will form part of the 'Moments Worth Paying For' campaign, which kicked off in February. The trailer will run in cinemas and online from today to 30 December.

The campaign aims to highlight the many official ways of watching films and TV shows in the UK by directing viewers to FindAnyFilm.com.

The full length film of 'Happy Feet 2' will be released by Warner Bros Pictures in 3D in cinemas nationwide and 2D in select cinemas on 2 December.

Liz Bales, director general of the Industry Trust for IP Awareness, said: "The trailer perfectly captures the emotional impact that great movie moments can have and helps to extend the reach of our campaign to a younger audience."

Josh Berger, president and managing director, Warner Bros UK, Ireland and Spain, said: "Copyright infringement remains a major challenge across the audiovisual sector.

"By supporting the 'Moments Worth Paying For' campaign with some key moments from 'Happy Feet 2', we are continuing to spread the message that the best way of enjoying high quality film and TV shows is through legally available services."

The Industry Trust for Intellectual Property Awareness was established in 2004 to tackle the growing issue of film and TV copyright infringement in the UK.

Follow Sara Kimberley on Twitter @SaraKimberley


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