Watch: technology and art collide in Tate Modern's new extension

Campaign headed to Bankside for a sneak preview of Tate Modern's highly anticipated extension, the Switch House, to find out more about two major new interactive Bloomberg Connects installations developed by Labs, Framestore's digital production division.

First up on the tour is Bloomberg Connects: Explore Artists’ Cities, located on Level 4 of Switch House.

It examines  the relationship between artist and location by ’spinning' visitors around a world map projected onto the floor, before settling on the location of one of the international artists in the gallery's collection. The wall projection then displays a split-screen array of artworks, profile information and interviews, in five-minute segments produced by Tate Modern. 

The second installation, Bloomberg Connects: Explore Performance, is situated on the third floor of the new building. It focuses on the history of live art and in a nod to this, a visitor’s physical presence within the space triggers archives of content to play out around the room.

According to Minnie Scott (curator, interpretation, learning,Tate Modern), the 16-year partnership between the gallery and Bloomberg Connects has encouraged the gallery to constantly innovate with digital installations. 

"We want the ways in which we’re offering people information and context to be as ambitious and exciting as the amazing art that we’re showing," she explained. 

Tate Modern kicks off three days of opening events, free to the public, from Friday 17 June. 

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