William Hill kicks off Take Control campaign with frenetic TV spot

William Hill, the bookmaker, has released an energetic TV campaign to advertise its in-play betting products.

The work, which is called "take control", will air on Sky Sports on 23 August, during Chelsea’s Premier League football match against West Bromwich Albion.

The ad is a frenetic mixture of football, cartoon explosions and aggressive cut-away scenes combined with an electro dance sound track by Knife Party, which makes for exhausting viewing.

It will be followed by two more spots, focusing on William Hill’s Priority Access card and its "cash in my bet" option, respectively. These ads will also be backed by press, social and radio executions.

The campaign was created by Bark&Bite, a creative and post-production company with offices in Leeds and Manchester. The agency has produced TV ads for William Hill’s online gambling brand, Vegas, as well as its horse-racing arm, for the past seven years.

William Hill handed its main sports betting account to Bark&Bite in May 2015 and now it is the bookmaker's only retained agency in the UK. William Hill has previously used agencies including BMB and Fabula for its main advertising account in the UK.

The ad was written by Christian Knowles-Fitton, art directed by Lee Roberts and directed by Ernest Desumbila through Mob Films.

Other bookmakers to release campaigns since the start of the Premier League football season on 8 August include:

SkyBet (creative by McGarrybowen)

Betway (creative by Above & Beyond)

Betfair (creative by Cubo)


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