The Work: New campaigns - The world

NOKIA - NOKIA 6265 LAUNCH - ASIA AND CANADA
CREDITS
Project: Nokia 6265 launch campaign
Client: Cory Jones, CDMA marketing manager, Nokia
Brief: Support the introduction of Nokia's multifeatured CDMA phone into
new global markets
Creative agency: Grey Worldwide
Writer: Brian Fallon
Art directors: Doug Fallon, Brian Fallon
Planner: Julia Silka
Media agency: n/a
Production company: Stardust Studios
Directors: Jake Banks, Neil Tsai
Editor: Dave Schulman, Stardust Studios
Post-production: Stardust Studios
Audio post-production: Snyder Music
Exposure: TV in Asia and Canada

THE LOWDOWN

Nokia is using TV advertising that merges live action and visual effects to launch what it claims is its most feature-rich handset to date.

Filmed at locations around Los Angeles, the 30-second spot shows young people in a range of colourful settings. Flowing bands of light lead from one scene to the next and the action culminates in a couple enjoying a fireworks display from the top of a skyscraper. The ad ends with a voiceover, which proclaims that the Nokia 6265 is "more than just a phone".

The film was produced by Stardust, a company that specialises in motion design, visual effects and live-action production. Doug Fallon, the Grey Worldwide creative director who oversaw the project, said: "Our whole purpose was to bring the audio-visual experience of the product to life."

CALIFORNIA COASTAL COMMISSION - NON-NATIVE SPECIES - US
CREDITS
Project: Non-native species
Clients: Christine Parry, public information manager; Judi Shils,
marketing director, California Coastal Commission
Brief: Promote this year's California Cleanup Day and other events
sponsored by the commission
Creative agency: Goodby Silverstein & Partners
Writer: Tyler Hampton
Art director: Paul Foulkes
Planner: Rene Courneyor
Media agency: Goodby Silverstein & Partners
Media planner: Jonathan Matthews
Production company: Stardust Studios
Director: Stardust Studios
Post-production: Stardust Studios
Exposure: TV in California

THE LOWDOWN

Californians are being urged to keep their coastline rubbish free in advertising that extends a campaign that won at Cannes this year.

Goodby Silverstein & Partners' 30-second ad takes its cue from previous poster images of creatures made from rubbish. They include a "spork crab" and a "cola bass".

The commercial shows a bird's egg hatching in polluted surroundings. What emerges is a "cigegret", a bird with cigarette butt for a beak. A voiceover says: "Trash is a non-native species of the Californian coast."

The film promotes California Cleanup Day and other events and will run until early October.

The California Coastal Commission is a quasi-judicial state agency tasked with conserving, restoring and enhancing the state's coastline.

CONVERSE - FENCE, TREE, LAMPPOST - CHINA
CREDITS
Project: Fence, tree, lamppost
Client: Zigo Xiao, marketing executive, Converse China
Brief: Showcase Converse's proprietary basketball shoe technology
Creative agency: Ogilvy Shanghai-Guangzhou
Writer: Andrew Lok
Art directors: Kevin Lee, Ken Chen
Planner: Frank Dong
Media agency: In-house
Photographer: Edmund, Untold Images
Retoucher: Untold Images
Exposure: Newspapers, magazines and outdoor in Southern China

THE LOWDOWN

With sports marketing experiencing a huge upswing in China in advance of the 2008 Beijing Olympics, Converse, the basketball shoe manufacturer, is running a series of tongue-in-cheek ads in an attempt to gain ground on its big-name rivals.

Although Converse is synonymous with basketball in the US, it has to make a modest budget go a long way in China. Not only must it chase Nike and Adidas but the local brand Li Ning, which is moving aggressively into the world market and recently signed the US basketball star Shaquille O'Neal to endorse its products.

The Converse campaign portrays the brand as not taking itself too seriously. The executions show Converse wearers having bizarre accidents as a result of taking advantage of their shoes' so-called "bounce technology".

NEW SOUTH WALES WOMEN'S REFUGES - NO WAY OUT - AUSTRALIA
CREDITS
Project: No way out
Client: Catherine Gander, executive officer, New South Wales Women's
Refuge Movement
Brief: Show that the under-funding of the charity makes it harder for
women to escape domestic violence
Creative agency: Publicis Mojo
Writer: Sean Larkin
Art director: Ruth Bellotti
Planner: Lisa Matchett
Media agency: Optimedia
Media planner: Ros Allison
Photographer: Tania Burkett, The Sunday Gardeners
Retouching: Toby Pike, Electric Art
Exposure: Newspapers, magazines and bus interiors in New South Wales

THE LOWDOWN

An Australian charity is using images of homes without windows or doors in a campaign to illustrate how many women and their children are trapped in a cycle of domestic violence.

The New South Wales Women's Refuge Movement is a network of 57 women's refuges across the state that provides support for victims of violence in the home.

Publicis Mojo's ads, which are intended to raise awareness and funds for the charity, show how houses become prisons for victims, and that domestic violence can occur in even the most comfortable-looking home.

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