WORLD OF INTERIORS: AN EXPERT’S VIEW - On its 100th issue, World of Interiors still looks great, Caroline Marshall believes

I’ve been a World of Interiors reader for more than 15 years. Or should I say viewer - like many, I suspect, I spend more time on the pics than the words. I’ve seen the cover price go from pounds 1.50 to today’s hefty pounds 3.20. I’ve hoarded it from university flea pits to rented flats, owned flats and houses.

I’ve been a World of Interiors reader for more than 15 years. Or

should I say viewer - like many, I suspect, I spend more time on the

pics than the words. I’ve seen the cover price go from pounds 1.50 to

today’s hefty pounds 3.20. I’ve hoarded it from university flea pits to

rented flats, owned flats and houses.



I still believe WoI is the pre-eminent title in the quality section of

the home interest market, providing a diet of stylish interiors by top

decorators as well as surprises: check out the garden full of painted

boulders at Revolver Creek in South Africa in the May issue.



WoI never spells out to its readers what they should and shouldn’t

do.



Rules, ideas and how-tos just don’t feature - they are there, of course,

but only in visual terms and it is this lack of prescription that keeps

me faithful.



I also like the fact that people so rarely feature in its pages. All its

rivals seem to go for showing people in envied surroundings with ’Wish

you were here?’ looks on their faces. The difference with WoI is that it

always has been exclusively about design and the things associated with

it - architecture, gardens, fine art and exhibitions.



The range of advertising carried is a good guide to the title’s

readership.



Nigh-on 100 of the 210 pages in the May issue are ads. Stylish pages and

spreads for Joseph, Chanel, Gucci, Saab and Volvo sit comfortably with

ads for Brinton, Gaggenau and prestige fabrics.



Quibbles? Just one. Although there are two nice advertorials in the May

issue, I’m left wondering how clever WoI is at generating below-the-line

opportunities for its readers and advertisers.



Funnily enough, after this paean of praise, I admit I’m probably a long

way from the magazine’s vision of its ideal reader - I suspect they have

someone like Anouska Hempel in mind. Ah well ...



Caroline Marshall is Campaign’s deputy editor.



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