WPP invests in digital media company from founder of Def Jam Records

WPP is to invest an undisclosed amount in All Def Digital, a Los Angeles digital media company founded by Russell Simmons, the co-founder of Def Jam Recordings.

WPP invests in digital media company from founder of Def Jam Records

ADD, whose slogan is "If you don’t have ADD, you’re not paying attention", was founded in 2013 and counts NBC Universal and Samsung among its clients.

The investment is being made through Silicon Valley-based WPP Ventures, which explores investments in new technology companies, with the intention of strengthening its ability offer innovative solutions to WPP clients.

ADD reaches more than 100 million users monthly via Youtube and Facebook, and describes itself as the fastest growing media brand in urban youth programming. It also distributes content through traditional and premium television, cinemas and live events, and works with advertisers through an in-house creative advertising agency.

WPP said the investment was a part of its strategy to differentiate its offer to clients through a focus on technology, data and content – drivers that have also led it to invest in companies like Hispanic-focused digital content creator Mitú, Inc, and fashion and lifestyle media brand Refinery 29.

Def Jam was founded by Simmons with Rick Rubin in 1983 and was instrumental in the development of hip hop, releasing music by the likes of Public Enemy, LL Cool J and the Beastie Boys. Simmons has also worked as a TV and film producer, and is a high profile animal rights activist.

Subscribe to Campaign from just £57 per quarter

Includes the weekly magazine and quarterly Campaign IQ, plus unrestricted online access.


Looking for a new job?

Get the latest creative jobs in advertising, media, marketing and digital delivered directly to your inbox each day.

Create an Alert Now

1 How Sainsbury's ads revolutionised the UK's food culture

Abbott Mead Vickers' press ads for Sainsbury's in the 1980s formed the most influential and culturally significant campaign the UK has ever produced, argues Paul Burke.

Just published