WPP moves Salmon under Wunderman to form new e-commerce division

Wunderman has launched a new division, Wunderman Commerce, with e-commerce consultancy Salmon providing the expertise.

Neil Stewart, global chief executive of Salmon, will head the new division
Neil Stewart, global chief executive of Salmon, will head the new division

Salmon, which joined WPP in 2013, will continue to operate as a standalone brand within Wunderman. It has operations in London, Amsterdam, New York. 

The consultancy provides digital commerce solutions to retail brands including Argos, Sainsbury’s, Selfridges, Ted Baker and Xerox. It has operations in London, Amsterdam, New York, Seattle, New Delhi, Beijing and Melbourne.

The launch of the commerce division will grant Wunderman enterprise-level retail and mobile commerce capabilities. Salmon, in turn, gains access to Wunderman’s clients, global scale, CRM capabilities and offshore marketing automation centres.

Neil Stewart, chief executive of Salmon will head the new division. 

"This development allows us to deliver our award-winning expertise to global brands and retailers and to work jointly with clients that are looking to achieve true digital transformation," Stewart said. 

This new development is another move by WPP into building out e-commerce capabilities. Sir Martin Sorrell has been worrying about the rise of Amazon for years now and more recently was quoted as saying that the online retailing giant was keeping him up at night.

Early last month, WPP-owned Possible bought Marketplace Ignition, an e-commerce agency focused on advising clients on how to grow their business on Amazon and other online marketplaces.

Mark Read, Wunderman’s global chief executive, said: "With an increasing share of retail growth coming from online channels and rising disruption from Amazon, Wunderman’s clients are looking for strategic and technical ability in building e-commerce solutions.

"Salmon’s expertise has been built in the UK, by many metrics the world’s most competitive e-commerce market."