Young's Seafood calls creative pitch

Young's Seafood is reviewing its estimated £10 million creative account as the Findus Group-owned fish brand looks to increase its in­vestment in above-the-line advertising.

Young’s Seafood: has kicked off the search for an agency that can inspire consumers to try more fish
Young’s Seafood: has kicked off the search for an agency that can inspire consumers to try more fish

The review is at an early stage – Young’s approached agencies directly this week with a view to discussing its advertising – and no inter­mediary has been appointed to oversee a pitch. Mother London is the incumbent on the account and is involved in the process.

The pitch coincides with changes to Young’s corporate structure and is being led by Wayne Hudson, who was hired as the managing director of its new frozen division in January.

Hudson told Campaign: "There is significant opportunity to encourage people to consume more responsibly sourced fish, and this will mean a significant increase in expenditure on above-the-line creative. As part of this, we are exploring our creative options with a small select group of people, including Mother, and exciting ideas to inspire consumers to try more fish."

The review does not affect Young’s media agency, Me­diaCom, which has worked with the brand since 2000. Mother has handled Young’s advertising account since 2009. The agency beat Bartle Bogle Hegarty, JWT and WCRS in pitch that was handled by AAR.

Mother’s most recent campaign for Young’s was a humorous TV spot called "smells so good" that promoted the brand’s home-style breaded cod and was set in a Cornish fishing village.

An older campaign, released in 2011, featured a ten-strong folk group called Fisherman’s Friends singing sea shanties.

Doner Cardwell Hawkins (now Doner) held Young’s advertising account before Mother.

Young’s turnover for the 2012-13 financial year was £582.7 million and its operating profit was £20.4 million.

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