Nicola Kemp

Head of features

Nicola Kemp is Head of Features at Campaign. She joined Marketing magazine in 2005 from Emap, where she was features reporter on Media & Marketing Europe, a pan-European monthly based in London.

Her first journalism job was as a financial journalist at Standard & Poors and she has a history degree from Bristol University.

The internet of nothing: the future of brand value in a sharing economy
Share

The internet of nothing: the future of brand value in a sharing economy

When the world's most powerful brands don't invest in creation or ownership in the traditional sense, where does the future of marketing value lie?

Creative Equals urges agencies to nominate their future female leaders
Share

Creative Equals urges agencies to nominate their future female leaders

Creative Equals and Campaign are calling for female creatives to apply to become a future leader.

'This girl can' moves from advertising to activism
Share

'This girl can' moves from advertising to activism

Sport England wants to avoid the 'difficult second album' with the next wave of its groundbreaking 'This girl can' activity, which has morphed a campaign into a community.

'This girl can' moves from advertising to activism
Share

'This girl can' moves from advertising to activism

Sport England wants to avoid the 'difficult second album' with the next wave of its groundbreaking 'This girl can' activity, which has morphed a campaign into a community.

How the smartphone killed conversation
Share

How the smartphone killed conversation

When you get a phone call these days the first assumption may well be that it is a wrong number or a rogue pocket dial, a shift with significant implications for brands.

Ask uncomfortable questions: UBS and boundary-pushing content marketing
Share

Ask uncomfortable questions: UBS and boundary-pushing content marketing

Through working with partners from Vice to Vanity Fair, UBS is addressing changing attitudes and pushing the boundaries of its content marketing.

Extreme convenience: How delivery became marketing's biggest disruptor
Share

Extreme convenience: How delivery became marketing's biggest disruptor

With consumers' expectations growing all the time, brands are recognising the need to create seamless buying experiences. Nicola Kemp meets the founders of one such company and explores how delivery has become marketing's biggest disruptor.

Why brands are getting political
Share

Why brands are getting political

Lyft and Airbnb have experienced a brand boost from their strong stance on president Trump's immigration ban with significant implications for brands.

'This girl can' targets older women with new campaign
Share

'This girl can' targets older women with new campaign

Sport England has set its sights on increasing sports participation among women in their fifties and sixties, with the next phase of its hugely successful "This girl can" campaign.

Marketers showcase #FlexAppeal in Power Part Time List
Share

Marketers showcase #FlexAppeal in Power Part Time List

Brands and agencies are at the forefront of "generation job share" with marketers from brands including Diageo, Johnson & Johnson and Sainsbury's and agencies such as Maxus and Leo Burnett netting a place in Timewise's Power Part Time List.

Brands embrace 'backlash feminism'
Share

Brands embrace 'backlash feminism'

Feminism is a well-established marketing tool but, with hundreds of thousands of women taking to the streets to demand equality, brands are grappling with a new wave of "backlash marketing".

#CEFuture Leaders event set for March
Share

#CEFuture Leaders event set for March

Creative Equals has partnered the IPA, D&AD, SheSays, ethnic-minority diversity initiative Stripes, PrideAM, Creative Social and Campaign to launch an event for promising female creatives.

Marketing in the age of the troll
Share

Marketing in the age of the troll

The rise of social media has transformed the nature of attention, a shift that is driving brand confusion and presenting marketers with substantial challenges.

Marketing in the age of the troll
Share

Marketing in the age of the troll

The rise of social media has transformed the nature of attention, a shift that is driving brand confusion and presenting marketers with substantial challenges.

Always-on shoppers suffer from January sales fatigue
Share

Always-on shoppers suffer from January sales fatigue

Businesses could be risking their brand equity through an over-reliance on discounting in January, according to research conducted by Campaign with digital insights company Toluna.

Start-up partners with agencies to highlight sustainable energy
Share

Start-up partners with agencies to highlight sustainable energy

Energy start-up Pavegen has partnered with a range of London-based creative agencies including Wunderman and Imagination to encourage agency staff to get active to generate the most clean-energy.

What a decade of iPhone means for brands
Share

What a decade of iPhone means for brands

Amongst many consumers their iphone has fast become their significant other, but what does this shift mean for brands?

Welcome to the age of moderate excess
Share

Welcome to the age of moderate excess

Skinny Prosecco is shaking up the wine market to target a social media generation obsessed with image and 'eating clean', Nicola Kemp writes.

MP calls on fashion industry to address body image problem
Share

MP calls on fashion industry to address body image problem

Caroline Dinenage, minister for women, equalities and early years, has called on the fashion industry to address unrealistic and idealised images of women's bodies.

'This girl can' marketer urges advertisers to embrace 'beautiful honesty'
Share

'This girl can' marketer urges advertisers to embrace 'beautiful honesty'

Tanya Joseph, the director of business partnerships at Sport England and the marketer behind the "This girl can" campaign, has urged advertisers to ditch the bullshit and recognise that images of real women can be aspirational.

YouTube to stop 30-second unskippable ads
Shares0
Share

1 YouTube to stop 30-second unskippable ads

Starting next year, YouTube will stop allowing the 30-second unskippable ad and will focus instead on shorter formats.

Just published

More