THE HISTORY OF ADVERTISING IN QUITE A FEW OBJECTS

History of Advertising No 97: The Marlboro Man's horse

History of Advertising No 97: The Marlboro Man's horse

Fortune came up with the most graphic comment on the seismic events of 2 April 1993 that rocked the marketing world to its foundations. It was, the magazine declared, "the day the Marlboro Man fell off his horse".

No 96: John E Powers' Wanamaker ads

No 96: John E Powers' Wanamaker ads

Calling John E Powers the father of modern creative advertising is no hyperbole. Nor is it any exaggeration to proclaim him the pioneer of tell-it-like-it-is copywriting. Born in 1837, Powers might arguably lay claim to being the world s first full-...

 
 
History of Advertising No 95: King of the Bill-Stickers

History of Advertising No 95: King of the Bill-Stickers

He was the self-crowned King of the Bill-Stickers. Nobody knows his name, but he was clearly confident of his place in the pecking order among the men who turned London into a poster-pasting free-for-all during the middle part of the 19th century.

 
 
History of Advertising No 94: 64 Lincoln's Inn Fields

History of Advertising No 94: 64 Lincoln's Inn Fields

Early in 1985, a basement office in Holborn became the unlikely starter home of what was to become the world's largest marketing communications group.

 
 
History of Advertising No 93: Today

History of Advertising No 93: Today

It is 19 years since Rupert Murdoch's News International pulled the plug on Today. Yet its role in helping free national newspapers from unions and their Luddite grip, and making them attractive to new advertisers, has cemented its legacy.

 
 
History of Advertising No 92: Midland Bank's head office

History of Advertising No 92: Midland Bank's head office

Had there been some other outcome to a meeting that took place in September 1987 at Midland Bank's City headquarters, the worlds of banking and advertising might be looking rather different today.

 
 
History of Advertising No 91: Lord Kitchener's recruiting poster

History of Advertising No 91: Lord Kitchener's recruiting poster

It is one of the most iconic advertising images of all time - and one of the most grimly compelling.

 
 
History of Advertising No 90: 'Labour isn't working' poster

History of Advertising No 90: 'Labour isn't working' poster

It only appeared on a handful of sites, was backed by a minuscule budget and its imagery was faked. Yet it's fair to say that the 1979 poster for the Conservative Party declaring "Labour isn't working" was a game-changer.

 
 
History of Advertising No 89: Irna Phillips' soap operas

History of Advertising No 89: Irna Phillips' soap operas

If Irna Phillips can t be called the mother of the soap opera, she was without doubt its midwife who could see daytime drama s potential for advertisers and delivered massively on her vision. She was in the right place at the right time. It was 1...

 
 
History of Advertising No 88: The Mackintosh Medal

History of Advertising No 88: The Mackintosh Medal

The Mackintosh Medal, the highest award that Britain's marketing communications industry can bestow on one of its own, is named after its first-ever winner and an artful exploiter of the country's collective sweet tooth.

 
 
History of Advertising No 87: The first ad with sex appeal

History of Advertising No 87: The first ad with sex appeal

Looking back with the benefit of a century s worth of hindsight, it s hard to understand what all the fuss was about over what is regarded as the first ad using sex to sell. Indeed, the images of elegant young ladies receiving the admiring attentio...

 
 
History of Advertising No 86: Coca-Cola's Santa Claus

History of Advertising No 86: Coca-Cola's Santa Claus

It's bad enough being told Santa Claus doesn't exist. Even worse to hear that the jolly man in the red suit spreading joy to the world's children was the invention of Coca-Cola and its ad agency.

 
 
History of Advertising No 85: The 'I heart New York' logo

History of Advertising No 85: The 'I heart New York' logo

The crumpled piece of paper that the designer Milton Glaser pulled from his pocket at New York's Wells Rich Greene agency one day in 1977 is now displayed at the city's Museum of Modern Art.

 
 
History of Advertising No 84: The world's first ad agency

History of Advertising No 84: The world's first ad agency

Madison Avenue's huge and prolonged influence on marketing communications across the world would lead most people to believe that ad agencies were a US invention. But that's not true.

 
 
History of Advertising No 83: Eglantyne Jebb's charity ads

History of Advertising No 83: Eglantyne Jebb's charity ads

Eglantyne Jebb and Dr Thomas Barnardo might be called the parents of the deluge of charity ads that today scream for attention from TV screens, newspapers and the web.

 
 
History of Advertising No 82: Peterhouse

History of Advertising No 82: Peterhouse

Peterhouse, the University of Cambridge's oldest college, is probably better known for its famous graduates - Michael Portillo and Sam Mendes among them - than as a venue for bringing adland and its critics together.

 
 
History of Advertising No 81: The first Apple Macintosh

History of Advertising No 81: The first Apple Macintosh

In these hi-tech times, it's almost impossible to comprehend the fear, apprehension and downright bloody-mindedness that greeted the arrival of the Apple Mac at agencies more than two decades ago.

 
 
History of Adverising No 80: Tufty

History of Adverising No 80: Tufty

Tufty, a cartoon red squirrel from East Cheam with a dangerous jaywalking habit, might seem an unlikely advertising icon. Yet he was central to one of the UK s most successful road-safety initiatives and credited with helping safeguard the lives of t...

 
 
History of Advertising No 79: The first drink-drive commercial

History of Advertising No 79: The first drink-drive commercial

Judged against the in-your-face style of today s drink-drive commercials, the first such spot to appear on British TV screens was as polite as a vicar s tea party. There was no car-crash carnage in the animated film that made its debut in 1964. Nor...

 
 
History of Advertising No 78: Compton's bone crusher

History of Advertising No 78: Compton's bone crusher

Efforts by agency groups to go public by taking control of a shell company have left them holding the keys to some unlikely assets.

 
 
No 77: Lou Klein's D&AD Pencil

No 77: Lou Klein's D&AD Pencil

At a time when advertising awards are so plentiful that their value is often debased, the status and integrity of a D&AD Pencil has never been in doubt.

 
 
No 76: The Layton Awards rule book

No 76: The Layton Awards rule book

The Layton Awards may be long forgotten, yet they have a special place in the history of UK advertising.

 
 
No 75: Adland's last cigarette (the fat lady sings)

No 75: Adland's last cigarette (the fat lady sings)

At midnight, on 13 February 2003, tobacco advertising in Britain took its last gasp. Its demise had been predicted as long ago as 1965 when cigarette ads were banned from TV.

 
 
No 74: Sir Frank Lowe's cricket bat

No 74: Sir Frank Lowe's cricket bat

As befitted his eccentric genius, Sir Frank Lowe could carry his love of sport to extreme lengths. During his time in charge at Collett Dickenson Pearce, the Lowe founder thought nothing of doing his rounds brandishing a cricket bat or dressing head ...

 
 
No 73: The first banner ad

No 73: The first banner ad

It all started in 1994 when HotWired, Wired s online arm, hit on a scheme to make some money out of its website. Its idea was to change advertising irrevocably. On 27 October that year, it caused the world s first banner ad to pop up a process ...

 
 
No 72: A Proton rocket

No 72: A Proton rocket

When a Russian Proton rocket emblazoned with a 30-foot Pizza Hut logo blasted into space from the Baikonur Cosmodrome launch site in Kazakhstan, it looked as though advertisers might be about to conquer their final frontier. Thirteen years on, howe...

 
 
No 71: Jules Chéret's first poster

No 71: Jules Chéret's first poster

Acclaimed as the father of outdoor advertising, Jules Ch ret had the most unlikely credentials to back his claim to fame. A one-time designer of jam-jar labels and invitation cards who left school at 13, his artistic skills were largely self-taught...

 
 
No 70: The Carbolic Smoke Ball ad

No 70: The Carbolic Smoke Ball ad

If the London housewife Louisa Carlill hadn t gone down with flu in January 1892, the story of advertising regulation in Britain might have been very different. Eager to avoid the flu epidemic that had spread across Europe killing 250,000 people, s...

 
 
History of Advertising No 69: Joe Namath's Super Bowl commercial

History of Advertising No 69: Joe Namath's Super Bowl commercial

If the doomsayers are right and the 30-second TV spot is all but dead, will the industry's future historians point to the Super Bowl as its last hurrah?

 
 
No 68: A bottle of Domaines Ott

No 68: A bottle of Domaines Ott

The relentless commercialisation of the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity has so far stopped short of including an official drink. But if it did, there could be only one contender the locally produced ros called Domaines Ott. For...

 
 
No 67: Ogilvy & Mather's speedboat

No 67: Ogilvy & Mather's speedboat

It wasn t just multimillion-pound inducements that the one-time owners of the Canary Wharf development offered to London s agencies to turn Docklands into a new "advertising village" in the late 80s. For Ogilvy Mather, they also threw in a speedb...

 
 
No 65: The Hidden Persuaders

No 65: The Hidden Persuaders

Ask people if they have read a book about advertising and chances are they will name The Hidden Persuaders. Since it was first published in 1957, Vance Packard s Orwellian portrait of ad people probing the unconscious desires of consumers has shape...

 
 
The history of advertising in quite a few objects: No 64 HAT's headquarters

The history of advertising in quite a few objects: No 64 HAT's headquarters

The best that can be said of a UK ad industry preoccupied with the here and now is that it has only ever supported the History of Advertising Trust now and then.

 
 
No 63: Neutralia's nipple

No 63: Neutralia's nipple

A commercial for a shower gel got a lot of people into quite a lather when it was aired 19 years ago. And the reason for the fuss? It was the first ad on UK television to feature a woman's nipple.

 
 
No 62: Bob Jacoby's coat

No 62: Bob Jacoby's coat

Bob Jacoby, the diminutive boss of Ted Bates, was as crafty as they come. In selling his agency, then the third-largest in the US, to the Saatchi brothers in 1985, he cut a personal deal worth a reported $110 million more than anybody had ever made...

 
 
No 61: A JCDecaux bus shelter

No 61: A JCDecaux bus shelter

The outdoor industry has been good to Jean-Claude Decaux, having turned him into one of France's few self-made multibillionaires.

 
 
No 60: The Grant Projector

No 60: The Grant Projector

In the days before Macs arrived in adland to dazzle agency art directors with their sophistication, there was the Grant Projector. From the 50s until the high-tech revolution rendered them redundant in the mid-90s, no creative department was withou...

 
 
No 59: Paul Green's £1 million cheque

No 59: Paul Green's £1 million cheque

Legend has it that Paul Green walked into his first client meeting as the founder of Britain s first media independent and offered to hand over a cheque for 1 million. It was a dramatic gesture to pledge the equivalent to what he promised would be...

 
 
No 58: The Garry Lace 'hoax'

No 58: The Garry Lace 'hoax'

It is one of UK advertising s great unsolved mysteries, a curious case that would have tested the deductive powers of Detective Chief Inspector Morse and is still the subject of much speculation whenever ad folk gather for a glass or two. Just who ...

 
 
No 57: Monkey

No 57: Monkey

He s known simply as Monkey, although he isn t a real primate. Just an animated knitted sock that can stake one of the oddest claims to a place in adland s annals. What s remarkable is that Monkey is probably the only character in modern advertisin...

 
 
No 56: First Sunday Times colour supplement

No 56: First Sunday Times colour supplement

Roy Thomson was famous for knowing instinctively where there was good advertising money to be made. But when the Canadian launched the Sunday Times magazine on 4 February 1962, adland was far from convinced he was on to a winner. Advertisers and ...

 
 
No 55: 'Think Small'

No 55: 'Think Small'

It was small, squat and so ugly that you would be forgiven for wondering why anybody apart from the German engineers who gave birth to it could have loved it. Yet it s no exaggeration to say that the Volkswagen Beetle was the spark plug that made a...

 
 
No 54: Robin Wight's wardrobe

No 54: Robin Wight's wardrobe

Seldom seen not wearing one of his trademark wildly coloured suits, Robin Wight is adland s perpetual Beau Brummell and may be the best living reminder of the time when the creative revolution in UK advertising also made it fashion-conscious for the ...

 
 
No 53: Bill Cosby's New Coke commercials

No 53: Bill Cosby's New Coke commercials

Was Bill Cosby the frontman for one of the world s greatest marketing cock-ups or the cleverest ever ploy to sustain a brand s market leadership? Twenty-eight years after the US comedian and actor fronted a set of commercials to introduce consumers...

 
 
No 53: Saatchi & Saatchi group HQ, Berkeley Square

No 53: Saatchi & Saatchi group HQ, Berkeley Square

A ten-minute walk separates Maurice Saatchi from what many industry commentators would cite as the most visible symbol of the salutary lesson history taught him.

 
 
No 52: The Old Bailey

No 52: The Old Bailey

If there was ever a moment when adland was forced to recognise that it could no longer take a devil-may-care approach to financial management, it occurred in November 1980 at the Old Bailey. But why a clutch of senior executives from what was then ...

 
 
51. BSB Squarial

51. BSB Squarial

Satellite broadcasting as we know it in Britain today was shaped by a dramatic confrontation and an eventual merger between the two organisations determined to dominate the new medium. In one corner stood the Rupert Murdoch-bankrolled Sky Telev...

 
 
50. The ASA's red tick

50. The ASA's red tick

The red tick that for almost 40 years has symbolised the Advertising Standards Authority s role as the no-nonsense enforcer of self-regulation was a direct result of official rebukes that the watchdog was not barking loudly enough. The accepted wis...

 
 
49. Humphreys

49. Humphreys

Four decades after they first appeared, the remaining memorabilia from one of the most memorable ad campaigns in the UK are still sought-after collectors items. Mugs, T-shirts, badges, aprons, straws and even sneakers complete with pom-poms regula...

 
 
48. La Trattoria Terrazza

48. La Trattoria Terrazza

Long before The Ivy and Le Caprice began eating away at adlanders' expense accounts, the trendiest dining place for free-spending agency types was known simply as the Tratt.

 
 
47. 16 Goodge Street

47. 16 Goodge Street

Imagine an agency building shared by Charles Saatchi, Sir John Hegarty and John Webster. Add Lord Puttnam and Martin Boase for good measure. And top it off with Stanley Pollitt, one of the founding fathers of account planning, and Michael Peters, the...

 
 
Tara Beard-Knowland

Simply, Better

 
 
 
Dave Trott

I HEART MEMES

 
 
 
Nick Jefferson

Jesus Games.

 
 
 
Andy Nairn

The Trust Trap strikes again

 
 
 
Dave Trott

BIG DATA v SMART DATA

 
 
 
NABS

Calling all heroes

 
 
 

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