THE HISTORY OF ADVERTISING IN QUITE A FEW OBJECTS

History Of Advertising: No 113: Ben Franklin's General Magazine

History Of Advertising: No 113: Ben Franklin's General Magazine

It is remarkable that advertising did not establish itself in the US until many years after it had done so in Britain. More remarkable still is that the man who set advertising on its way in America was one of the country s founding fathers. Indeed...

 
 
History Of Advertising: No 112: The world's first TV commercial

History Of Advertising: No 112: The world's first TV commercial

It wasn t what you would call a memorable piece of TV advertising. Just a ten-second spot featuring a simple graphic and a voiceover that proclaimed: "America runs on Bulova time." Yet the moment it aired at 2.29pm on l July 1941 on the NBC-owned W...

 
 
History Of Advertising: No 111: The first CSR ads

History Of Advertising: No 111: The first CSR ads

Companies eager to generate goodwill towards themselves from consumers by advertising their ethical credentials might seem like a relatively new phenomenon. In fact, it s only increasingly crowded marketplaces forcing companies to look for new ways...

 
 
History Of Advertising: No 110: The Hathaway man's eyepatch

History Of Advertising: No 110: The Hathaway man's eyepatch

It was just a spur-of-the-moment thing. David Ogilvy, on his way to a photo shoot for his new shirt-maker client, stopped off at a New York drugstore to buy a few 50 cent black eyepatches and unwittingly blazed the trail for a new style of advertis...

 
 
History Of Advertising: No 109: The government's Aids campaign

History Of Advertising: No 109: The government's Aids campaign

If there was a time that British advertising proved it could be an overwhelming force for good, it was surely during the government s high-impact Aids awareness campaign. Almost three decades after it first shocked millions of TV viewers with its i...

 
 
History of advertising: No 108: Thomas Edison's Admiral Cigarettes film

History of advertising: No 108: Thomas Edison's Admiral Cigarettes film

At a time when most of adland would rather forget its long and contentious association with tobacco, it would probably prefer not to be reminded of the product s pioneering place in its history. In 1897, Thomas Edison s production company created t...

 
 
No 107: John Caples' 'They laughed when...' ad

No 107: John Caples' 'They laughed when...' ad

Lester Wunderman is widely considered the father of modern direct marketing. But even he bends his knee to John Caples, the man who penned one of the best-known DM ads of all time, which was headlined: "They laughed when I sat down at the piano but ...

 
 
No 106: Benetton's 'shockvertising'

No 106: Benetton's 'shockvertising'

No company was more synonymous with 90s fashion s so-called "shockvertising" phenomenon than Benetton. And nobody pushed the creative boundaries further than its shocktrooper-in-chief, Oliviero Toscani. Toscani was at pains to point out that he was...

 
 
No 105: Madison Avenue

No 105: Madison Avenue

Just as the world has always associated New York s Fifth Avenue with high fashion and regarded Broadway as synonymous with showbiz, so Madison Avenue is seen as advertising s spiritual home. But while shoppers still throng to Fifth Avenue and Broad...

 
 
No 104: Maurice Saatchi's Rolodex

No 104: Maurice Saatchi's Rolodex

With competition for new business so relentless and cut-throat, it is hard to imagine a time when industry rules governing the way agencies could go about finding it were verging on the Corinthian. Not only was trying to steal a competitor s client...

 
 
History of Advertising No 103: André Citroën's Eiffel Tower ad

History of Advertising No 103: André Citroën's Eiffel Tower ad

On the night of 4 July 1925, thousands of Parisians gawped in amazement as 250,000 light bulbs burst into life on the Eiffel Tower, emblazoning the family name of the car-maker Andr Citro n across the French capital. Even for a man renowned as one...

 
 
History of advertising: No 102: 'Daisy girl'

History of advertising: No 102: 'Daisy girl'

Almost 50 years ago, a 60-second commercial that was explosive in every sense was screened across the US. It ran only once. Yet the "daisy girl" spot changed forever the way that politicians sold themselves to voters. It featured a three-year-old, ...

 
 
History of advertising: No 101: Ad agency messenger boys

History of advertising: No 101: Ad agency messenger boys

Question: What do Sir Frank Lowe and the late entertainer Max Bygraves (pictured) have in common? And what links Chris Ingram, the inventor of the standalone media agency, with Brian Clemens, the creator of The Avengers ? Answer: They all began th...

 
 
History of Advertising No 100: Ads of the Great War

History of Advertising No 100: Ads of the Great War

It almost beggars belief that something as horrific as the Great War should have helped shape modern advertising: powerful ads from companies building emotional bonds with consumers. The conflict also created an environment that allowed new product...

 
 
History of Advertising No 99: The personal video recorder

History of Advertising No 99: The personal video recorder

A couple of years ago, Anthony Wood, the Silicon Valley entrepreneur credited with creating the personal video recorder (the device many predicted would mark the end of TV commercials), declared his invention was dead. With the penetration of PVRs ...

 
 
The history of advertising No 98: Pears soap's Bubbles poster

The history of advertising No 98: Pears soap's Bubbles poster

Thomas J Barratt has secured a place in advertising history as the man who first annexed high culture to commercialism when he bought the copyright to Sir John Everett Millais painting Bubbles for 2,200 and used it to sell Pears soap. Yet there ...

 
 
History of Advertising No 97: The Marlboro Man's horse

History of Advertising No 97: The Marlboro Man's horse

Fortune came up with the most graphic comment on the seismic events of 2 April 1993 that rocked the marketing world to its foundations. It was, the magazine declared, "the day the Marlboro Man fell off his horse".

 
 
History of advertising No 96: John E Powers' Wanamaker ads

History of advertising No 96: John E Powers' Wanamaker ads

Calling John E Powers the father of modern creative advertising is no hyperbole. Nor is it any exaggeration to proclaim him the pioneer of tell-it-like-it-is copywriting. Born in 1837, Powers might arguably lay claim to being the world s first full-...

 
 
History of Advertising No 95: King of the Bill-Stickers

History of Advertising No 95: King of the Bill-Stickers

He was the self-crowned King of the Bill-Stickers. Nobody knows his name, but he was clearly confident of his place in the pecking order among the men who turned London into a poster-pasting free-for-all during the middle part of the 19th century.

 
 
History of Advertising No 94: 64 Lincoln's Inn Fields

History of Advertising No 94: 64 Lincoln's Inn Fields

Early in 1985, a basement office in Holborn became the unlikely starter home of what was to become the world's largest marketing communications group.

 
 
History of Advertising No 93: Today

History of Advertising No 93: Today

It is 19 years since Rupert Murdoch's News International pulled the plug on Today. Yet its role in helping free national newspapers from unions and their Luddite grip, and making them attractive to new advertisers, has cemented its legacy.

 
 
History of Advertising No 92: Midland Bank's head office

History of Advertising No 92: Midland Bank's head office

Had there been some other outcome to a meeting that took place in September 1987 at Midland Bank's City headquarters, the worlds of banking and advertising might be looking rather different today.

 
 
History of Advertising No 91: Lord Kitchener's recruiting poster

History of Advertising No 91: Lord Kitchener's recruiting poster

It is one of the most iconic advertising images of all time - and one of the most grimly compelling.

 
 
History of Advertising No 90: 'Labour isn't working' poster

History of Advertising No 90: 'Labour isn't working' poster

It only appeared on a handful of sites, was backed by a minuscule budget and its imagery was faked. Yet it's fair to say that the 1979 poster for the Conservative Party declaring "Labour isn't working" was a game-changer.

 
 
History of Advertising No 89: Irna Phillips' soap operas

History of Advertising No 89: Irna Phillips' soap operas

If Irna Phillips can t be called the mother of the soap opera, she was without doubt its midwife who could see daytime drama s potential for advertisers and delivered massively on her vision. She was in the right place at the right time. It was 1...

 
 
History of Advertising No 88: The Mackintosh Medal

History of Advertising No 88: The Mackintosh Medal

The Mackintosh Medal, the highest award that Britain's marketing communications industry can bestow on one of its own, is named after its first-ever winner and an artful exploiter of the country's collective sweet tooth.

 
 
History of Advertising No 87: The first ad with sex appeal

History of Advertising No 87: The first ad with sex appeal

Looking back with the benefit of a century s worth of hindsight, it s hard to understand what all the fuss was about over what is regarded as the first ad using sex to sell. Indeed, the images of elegant young ladies receiving the admiring attentio...

 
 
History of Advertising No 86: Coca-Cola's Santa Claus

History of Advertising No 86: Coca-Cola's Santa Claus

It's bad enough being told Santa Claus doesn't exist. Even worse to hear that the jolly man in the red suit spreading joy to the world's children was the invention of Coca-Cola and its ad agency.

 
 
History of Advertising No 85: The 'I heart New York' logo

History of Advertising No 85: The 'I heart New York' logo

The crumpled piece of paper that the designer Milton Glaser pulled from his pocket at New York's Wells Rich Greene agency one day in 1977 is now displayed at the city's Museum of Modern Art.

 
 
History of Advertising No 84: The world's first ad agency

History of Advertising No 84: The world's first ad agency

Madison Avenue's huge and prolonged influence on marketing communications across the world would lead most people to believe that ad agencies were a US invention. But that's not true.

 
 
History of Advertising No 83: Eglantyne Jebb's charity ads

History of Advertising No 83: Eglantyne Jebb's charity ads

Eglantyne Jebb and Dr Thomas Barnardo might be called the parents of the deluge of charity ads that today scream for attention from TV screens, newspapers and the web.

 
 
History of Advertising No 82: Peterhouse

History of Advertising No 82: Peterhouse

Peterhouse, the University of Cambridge's oldest college, is probably better known for its famous graduates - Michael Portillo and Sam Mendes among them - than as a venue for bringing adland and its critics together.

 
 
History of Advertising No 81: The first Apple Macintosh

History of Advertising No 81: The first Apple Macintosh

In these hi-tech times, it's almost impossible to comprehend the fear, apprehension and downright bloody-mindedness that greeted the arrival of the Apple Mac at agencies more than two decades ago.

 
 
History of Adverising No 80: Tufty

History of Adverising No 80: Tufty

Tufty, a cartoon red squirrel from East Cheam with a dangerous jaywalking habit, might seem an unlikely advertising icon. Yet he was central to one of the UK s most successful road-safety initiatives and credited with helping safeguard the lives of t...

 
 
History of Advertising No 79: The first drink-drive commercial

History of Advertising No 79: The first drink-drive commercial

Judged against the in-your-face style of today s drink-drive commercials, the first such spot to appear on British TV screens was as polite as a vicar s tea party. There was no car-crash carnage in the animated film that made its debut in 1964. Nor...

 
 
History of Advertising No 78: Compton's bone crusher

History of Advertising No 78: Compton's bone crusher

Efforts by agency groups to go public by taking control of a shell company have left them holding the keys to some unlikely assets.

 
 
History of Advertising No 77: Lou Klein's D&AD Pencil

History of Advertising No 77: Lou Klein's D&AD Pencil

At a time when advertising awards are so plentiful that their value is often debased, the status and integrity of a D&AD Pencil has never been in doubt.

 
 
No 76: The Layton Awards rule book

No 76: The Layton Awards rule book

The Layton Awards may be long forgotten, yet they have a special place in the history of UK advertising.

 
 
No 75: Adland's last cigarette (the fat lady sings)

No 75: Adland's last cigarette (the fat lady sings)

At midnight, on 13 February 2003, tobacco advertising in Britain took its last gasp. Its demise had been predicted as long ago as 1965 when cigarette ads were banned from TV.

 
 
No 74: Sir Frank Lowe's cricket bat

No 74: Sir Frank Lowe's cricket bat

As befitted his eccentric genius, Sir Frank Lowe could carry his love of sport to extreme lengths. During his time in charge at Collett Dickenson Pearce, the Lowe founder thought nothing of doing his rounds brandishing a cricket bat or dressing head ...

 
 
No 73: The first banner ad

No 73: The first banner ad

It all started in 1994 when HotWired, Wired s online arm, hit on a scheme to make some money out of its website. Its idea was to change advertising irrevocably. On 27 October that year, it caused the world s first banner ad to pop up a process ...

 
 
No 72: A Proton rocket

No 72: A Proton rocket

When a Russian Proton rocket emblazoned with a 30-foot Pizza Hut logo blasted into space from the Baikonur Cosmodrome launch site in Kazakhstan, it looked as though advertisers might be about to conquer their final frontier. Thirteen years on, howe...

 
 
No 71: Jules Chéret's first poster

No 71: Jules Chéret's first poster

Acclaimed as the father of outdoor advertising, Jules Ch ret had the most unlikely credentials to back his claim to fame. A one-time designer of jam-jar labels and invitation cards who left school at 13, his artistic skills were largely self-taught...

 
 
No 70: The Carbolic Smoke Ball ad

No 70: The Carbolic Smoke Ball ad

If the London housewife Louisa Carlill hadn t gone down with flu in January 1892, the story of advertising regulation in Britain might have been very different. Eager to avoid the flu epidemic that had spread across Europe killing 250,000 people, s...

 
 
History of Advertising No 69: Joe Namath's Super Bowl commercial

History of Advertising No 69: Joe Namath's Super Bowl commercial

If the doomsayers are right and the 30-second TV spot is all but dead, will the industry's future historians point to the Super Bowl as its last hurrah?

 
 
No 68: A bottle of Domaines Ott

No 68: A bottle of Domaines Ott

The relentless commercialisation of the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity has so far stopped short of including an official drink. But if it did, there could be only one contender the locally produced ros called Domaines Ott. For...

 
 
No 67: Ogilvy & Mather's speedboat

No 67: Ogilvy & Mather's speedboat

It wasn t just multimillion-pound inducements that the one-time owners of the Canary Wharf development offered to London s agencies to turn Docklands into a new "advertising village" in the late 80s. For Ogilvy Mather, they also threw in a speedb...

 
 
No 65: The Hidden Persuaders

No 65: The Hidden Persuaders

Ask people if they have read a book about advertising and chances are they will name The Hidden Persuaders. Since it was first published in 1957, Vance Packard s Orwellian portrait of ad people probing the unconscious desires of consumers has shape...

 
 
The history of advertising in quite a few objects: No 64 HAT's headquarters

The history of advertising in quite a few objects: No 64 HAT's headquarters

The best that can be said of a UK ad industry preoccupied with the here and now is that it has only ever supported the History of Advertising Trust now and then.

 
 
No 63: Neutralia's nipple

No 63: Neutralia's nipple

A commercial for a shower gel got a lot of people into quite a lather when it was aired 19 years ago. And the reason for the fuss? It was the first ad on UK television to feature a woman's nipple.

 
 
Lol and Nat

FROM TEA TO BISCUITS… AND DAVE DYE’S FIRST BOOK

 
 
 
Dave Trott

THE BEST BOOKS ARE THE ONES YOU ACTUALLY READ

 
 
 
Dave Trott

DOING WELL BY DOING GOOD

 
 
 
Tara Beard-Knowland

Did you see? Did you hear?

 
 
 
Dave Trott

WHAT DO YOU USE FOR FUEL?

 
 
 
Jonathan Akwue

Facebook’s Rooms App Could be a Horror Story in the Making

 
 
 

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