Xerox 'watercooler' by RKCR/Y&R

2.0 39 Votes

Xerox has launched a multimillion-pound pan-European campaign to promote its market-leading range of colour multifunction products. This new initiative includes Xerox's first ever viral film, directed by Owen Harris, which follows the antics of a company working hyper-productively in order to meet business targets. The documentary-style tour around the office shows workers in various extreme states of busy-ness, veering out of control in their attempts to deliver on time. The film draws to a close with the reassurance that "there are better ways to make your office more productive". The integrated campaign, created by RKCR/Y&R, comprises press, radio and viral advertising as well as online creative by Vibrant Creative.

Share On:

Released: 05 March 2007

Credits

Client
Henrik Bustrup at Xerox Europe; David Millican at Xerox UK
Brief

To raise awareness of the Xerox colour multifunction products
Creative agency
Rainey Kelly Campbell Roalfe/Y&R
Planner
Jon Tipple
Art director
Mike Crowe, Smollensky & Blake
Copywriter
Robert Messeter, Smollensky & Blake
Director
Owen Harris
Production company
Hungryman
Media agency
Mediaegde:cia
Media planner
Peter Colvin, Richard Astley
Online agency
Vibrant Creative
DM agency
Harrison Troughton Wunderman

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus

Related News

Xerox 'ready for real business' by Y&R New York

Xerox 'ready for real business' by Y&R New York

Xerox has launched two spots as part of its "ready for real business" campaign.

Xerox 'information overload syndrome' by Y&R New York

Xerox 'information overload syndrome' by Y&R New York

Spoof public service announcement viral, warning of the dangers of information overload.