Adidas adopts caring tone in new campaign

Adidas is letting its serious sports image slip in a new campaign which light-heartedly suggests that wearing Adidas gear could make you more caring.

Adidas is letting its serious sports image slip in a new campaign

which light-heartedly suggests that wearing Adidas gear could make you

more caring.



The All Blacks rugby player, Jonah Lomu, tennis star, Anna Kournikova,

and Trinidadian sprinter, Ato Boldon, are shown using their particular

gifts - and Adidas kit - to help others, in a campaign by the Dutch

agency, 180.



’Our target audience is tired of yet another brand saying how great it

is,’ Neil Simpson, Adidas’ global advertising director, explained. ’We

still wanted to focus on performance, but we wanted to do it in a way

that talks to youth.’



The Lomu execution, for example, sees the powerfully built Kiwi winger

dodge obstacles and nudge vans out of his path in a mad dash to the sea

to restore a dying fish to its home waters.



In a similar vein, Boldon chases a moped-riding thief through the

streets of Brooklyn before catching him, while Kournikova is seen

winning a stuffed bear in a showground game, and then giving it away to

children who had been cheated by the game’s owner. All three use the

endline: ’Adidas makes you better.’



Reports that the football star, David Beckham, would feature in a

follow-up later this year could not be confirmed.



The campaign breaks this week on TV and at the cinema before the movie,

The Beach.



It was written by Lorenzo De Rita, art directed by Dean Maryon, and

directed by Fredrik Bond through Harry Nash. Media buying is through

Carat.



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