Advertising Standards Authority rejects permission marketing complaint

The Advertising Standards Authority has overturned a complaint against Royal Mail offshoot The Postal Preference Service over claims that its direct mail filtering service for consumers would undermine the sector.

The Advertising Standards Authority has overturned a complaint against Royal Mail offshoot The Postal Preference Service over claims that its direct mail filtering service for consumers would undermine the sector.

The ASA rejected the claims, made by WWAV Rapp Collins, saying there was no case under the British Code of Advertising and Sales Promotion.

The company objected to the PPS's plans to offer consumers the choice of what direct mail they wanted to receive. It said that only those companies signing up for the PPS scheme would be eligible and that mailings would confuse customers. It also said the Royal Mail branding would lead consumers to believe they were obliged to fill in the survey.

PPS managing director Bryan Cassady said: "As with any new concept we expected a reaction. I believe that our entry into the industry has brought some key issues to the forefront and this can only be good for the industry as a whole."

He added that 88% of consumers though the service was a good idea. Seventy of the top 200 advertisers are said to have signed for the programme.



Topics