HOW TO GET AHEAD: WORKING ABROAD ... BUENOS AIRES - Argy-bargy’s no problem, but in this stylish capital it helps if you like beef

Buenos Aires is the Paris of South America. The Argentine capital’s tree-lined boulevards and squares are dotted with cafes, giving it a distinctly European flavour. But that’s where the similarities end, warns Gillian Pollock, managing director of Initiative Media Argentina, who has worked there for three years.

Buenos Aires is the Paris of South America. The Argentine capital’s

tree-lined boulevards and squares are dotted with cafes, giving it a

distinctly European flavour. But that’s where the similarities end,

warns Gillian Pollock, managing director of Initiative Media Argentina,

who has worked there for three years.



’It feels like Europe and even looks like it, but after a week you

realise it’s definitely not. It certainly doesn’t keep to a European

timetable. People do things at their own pace and you have to find your

own way to deal with that, or you’ll go crazy.



’At the moment, adspend is down but some sectors remain healthy. Procter

& Gamble launched Ariel and Bold here this year and, as one of our key

clients is Unilever, we’ve found ourselves in the middle of a detergent

war.



’The city is clean and pollution is relatively low compared with other

cities in the region. It’s also safer than Mexico City or Sao Paulo. You

can walk home at night if you live in the right area, although lack of

security is becoming a big issue.



’You can’t work here if you don’t speak Spanish, preferably with an

Italian accent. And it’s a struggle if you’re a vegetarian because

everyone eats beef, which is of a fantastic quality. Because so many

Italians settled here, I think Buenos Aires has the best pasta, pizza

and ice-cream in the world. People are generally very stylish, but it’s

expensive.’