HOW TO GET AHEAD: WORKING ABROAD ... LUSAKA - Sampling the culture and carnivals compensates for the dodgy food and sexism

Kristina Embry, regional account manager at CNBC, worked in Lusaka for a year as a consultant for Young & Rubicam.

Kristina Embry, regional account manager at CNBC, worked in Lusaka

for a year as a consultant for Young & Rubicam.



’I was working in new business and focused my efforts on Toyota - the

car and oil industries are huge in Zambia.



’While working for Toyota, I introduced a membership programme,

something the Lusakans had never seen before. The idea was essentially a

loyalty scheme - similar to store cards - and it fascinated people. I

roped in hotels like Intercontinental and Holiday Inn, as well as

companies like DHL and Multichoice.



’I also presented a radio show once a week in which Toyota had a

half-hour slot that was mainly broadcast in English.



’There wasn’t much nightlife in Lusaka, with only five restaurants - two

Italian and three Chinese - in the entire city. The food sold on the

streets was to be avoided at all costs - I went down with food poisoning

three times. Illness is something you have to watch out for, it’s the

same all over Africa.



’There were a couple of good pubs - I particularly remember a bar called

Chasers. But social activities mainly comprised visiting peoples’

houses. Public transport is virtually non-existent.



’Zambia is a great place to experience tradition and culture, and there

were carnivals taking place all the time. But women should be aware it

is an extremely male-dominated society.’



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