How To Get Ahead: Working Abroad ... Prague - In this city it’s easy to get a tongue sarnie, but you may prefer the dumplings

Czech-speaking Tracy-Lee Bins, now at Galaxy Radio, thought she was in for a pleasant few months when posted to Prague. ’Don’t be fooled by the medieval streets and romantic facades,’ she warns.

Czech-speaking Tracy-Lee Bins, now at Galaxy Radio, thought she was

in for a pleasant few months when posted to Prague. ’Don’t be fooled by

the medieval streets and romantic facades,’ she warns.



And don’t expect to eat out very often, either. ’The main dish on almost

every menu in every restaurant is pork and dumplings, otherwise known as

kneidicki. It’s a terrible city for vegetarians as most culinary treats

involve some organ or other, often displayed in the windows of

cosy-looking eateries. Regular delicacies like tongue and pig’s trotters

require a strong constitution. If possible, don’t overdo the meat - a

recent survey suggested 75 per cent of restaurants had meat contaminated

with salmonella.’



Not many people speak English, so business folk use translators -

although the younger generation have started learning the lingo. The

locals work long hours and free weekends are few and far between. ’They

haven’t grasped the concept of a five-day week. But the end of the

communist regime means salaries are competitive and young people are

spending, so it’s a great place for marketers.



’Prague is quite dangerous, with a large community of pick-pockets in

the city centre. Corruption is rife - I paid fines for everything from

speeding to turning down the wrong street. Accommodation is hard to

find; expect mangles instead of washing machines unless you’re prepared

to pay a fortune.’



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