Always enlists more feisty sportswomen to update '#LikeAGirl' in time for the Olympics

Social video expert Be On reviews "#LikeAGirl", the latest viral video from Always.

This brand wants girls to keep playing and keep pushing back, following a recent NHCS study found that women aged 18 to 24 are twice as likely to be confident if they play sports regularly.


9/10

When you think of the brands that have made a positive impact empowering women in sport, the Always "Like a girl" campaign will almost certainly feature top of the list.

Always took the world by storm when it first launched the activity in June 2014, highlighting how negative female stereotypes are created later on in life, particularly when girls begin puberty.

The campaign attracted a huge amount of press and public interest, taking home a Glass Lion in Cannes, while the has video clocked up more than 62 million views on YouTube to date.

The brand shows how motivation relies on mental wellbeing and encouragement to thrive, and that physical and hormonal adolescent changes are not to blame. And Always is not prepared to let this message dwindle.

"Keep playing" addresses the fact that half of young women quit the sports they’re passionate about due to outside pressures associated with their gender. The spot comes four weeks before the 2016 Olympic Games, for which the brand is a partner.

These girls are feisty and passionate, serving as great role models as they fight to be the best players and team captains they can be. The spot follows the now well-known format of interviewing real girls, asking simple questions that start wider global conversations.

The girls recount numerous stories where they’ve been told they aren’t as aggressive on the pitch as men, or they simply can’t do a particular sport. This brand wants girls to keep playing and keep pushing back, following a recent NHCS study found that women aged 18 to 24 are twice as likely to be confident if they play sports regularly.

In March this year, Always highlighted another subtle way in which girls are misrepresented in society when they called for emojis to change for the better. Here is a brand that keeps adapting its message to drive momentum.