Alzheimer’s Society calls on government to ‘cure the care system’

The film depicts a woman's daily struggles to get adequate support for her husband with dementia.


Alzheimer’s Society is campaigning to fix the social care system with a powerful film revealing one woman’s struggles to look after her husband with dementia. 

“Cure the care system”, created by Engine Creative, focuses on the plight of carers by depicting a woman whose life is derailed when her husband is diagnosed with dementia. The ad plays out through her distressing phone calls and daily challenges during which she tries and fails to get the support she needs to care for her spouse. 

She finally receives a voicemail that tells her “your application for care funding has been unsuccessful”. 

The 90-second film ends with the line, “Without support, dementia claims more than one life”, and invites viewers to sign a petition to reform social care.

The charity’s campaign coincides with Dementia Action Week (17-23 May) and will run for six weeks across TV, cinema, out of home, press and social media. 

The print ads use black and white photography laid over a blue background, with messages such as: “My wife has Alzheimer's, I’m forgetting who am.” 

The work was created by Chris da Roza and Hugo Isaacs, and directed by Novemba through Academy. Medialab is the media agency. 

Alzheimer’s Society is calling attention to the promise of Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who said in 2019: “We will fix the crisis in social care once and for all.” Its campaign urges the governments of England, Wales and Northern Ireland to reform the social care system by providing better-quality care that is free and easy to access, like the NHS. It is also asking that social care workers receive better pay, training and working conditions. 

Chris Gottlieb, director of marketing and communications at Alzheimer’s Society, said: “It's extremely important not just to those affected by dementia, but to all of us, that the government reform the broken social care system, to make it one that we’re proud of and want to grow old in. Only then will people with dementia get the support and care they so desperately need, and families be able to spend time in their most important roles: that of husbands, wives, sons and daughters.”

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