Army drive features everyday life

Saatchi & Saatchi has ditched its usual scenes of soldiers in combat scenarios and the 'job for life' strapline for its latest Army recruitment campaign. Instead, the work will focus on the everyday occupations of potential recruits.

Saatchi & Saatchi has ditched its usual scenes of soldiers in combat scenarios and the 'job for life' strapline for its latest Army recruitment campaign. Instead, the work will focus on the everyday occupations of potential recruits.

Three 30-second ads feature young people in civilian situations that show their potential as soldiers. The strapline is: 'If you've got what it takes - take it further.'

In 'floorboards', a young man carefully picks his way down a darkened hallway to his girlfriend's bedroom. As she encourages him with a smouldering pout, her father stumbles out of his bedroom on a visit to the bathroom.

The girlfriend slams her door, while her boyfriend spreadeagles himself across some shelves above the unsuspecting father's head.

Two other ads, 'crossbar' and 'cubists', feature youngsters rebuilding cars and mending a football goal in urban settings to emphasise initiative and creativity.

Dave Droga, Saatchis' creative director, said the aim was to focus on the 70 per cent of non-combat jobs that form the backbone of the Army.

He said that the ads, which break on Friday for an initial four-week burst, show how training for the Army translates well into civilian life and vice versa.

'This is a radically different approach, which will also launch a members-only website, a special magazine and careers video,' Droga said.

'We wanted to appeal to ordinary civilians. We didn't want to lose the 'be the best' slogan, but it was time for a radical change.'

The ads were written by Kes Gray, art directed by Dennis Willison, directed by Jason Smith and produced by the Artists Company. Media planning is through Saatchis and media buying is through MediaVest.

The award-winning 'job for life' campaign has run for six years. Army recruitment has doubled over that period, according to Saatchis.



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